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Saturday, September 14, 2019

7 Major Mistakes Limiting Your Calf Size - bodybuilding110

Every trainee I know covets a set of nicely developed calves. If you’re like me, and many other bodybuilders, you’re in constant pursuit of turning your calves into full-blown cows! There are very few muscle groups that I (and many others) have found to be as stubborn to grow as calves. Indeed, the lack of progress in calf development has discouraged many trainees to the point where they reluctantly give up in their pursuit of bigger calves.



Even if you consider yourself to be the owner the world’s worst calf genetics, you can make more progress if you will just avoid making these common calf-training mistakes, as listed below! By avoiding these common mistakes, you can break past any temporary training plateaus you might have, to get you on the road to those developed calves you’ve always wanted.

Here’s the list of 7 common calf training mistakes:

1 Training calves at the end of your workout:

Calves are often neglected or saved for the last part of a leg workout, this is when you’re tired and lack energy. Muscles can’t grow if they receive sub-par training, you must start training them the way you train your back or chest: fresh, from every angle, and to complete exhaustion.

Start your leg training with calves, train them with the same intensity as you do your quads and hamstrings. If you’re trying to hit your upper legs hard and don’t have the energy to do the same with calves, add an extra calf day into your split or add the work to a different workout. The point is to ensure that your calves don’t suffer from lack of attention.

2 Training Calves Once a Week:

Training calves once a week is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Even if you only want to keep one major leg day a week (quads, hamstring, calves), try adding calves onto other workouts throughout the week so your training calves 2-3 times a week and sticking to the 10-15 Rep Range.

While this rep range might be effective for most other parts of your body, calves are a bit different. You need to look at doing 20+ reps preferably closer to 30.  This forces you to use a lighter weight which means better form.

This leads to a better contraction of the calves muscles and a better pump following those 30 reps. It also allows you to overload a muscle that is used to high rep work (remember your calves get a lot of work naturally throughout the day just from walking around.

3 Using Too Heavy Weights:

While lifting heavy is important to building muscle, if the weights are so big that you can’t use proper form then you won’t see much benefit. Symptoms of using too much weight include bouncing the weight at the bottom of reps, or not contracting at the top of reps.

Worse you might end up bringing other leg muscles into the exercise to help move the weight. In addition to reducing your gains training this way will also set you up for possible injury. If you feel pain in your Achilles tendon then you are definitely lifting too much weight.

Similarly, if you are unable to perform standing calf raises without bending your knees, or seated calf raises without using your arms to help the weight up then you need to adjust the resistance downwards.

4 Only Training With Small Weights:

To look on the opposite point of view, you cannot expect results only training with light weight and high reps. Calves are one of the high resistance muscle groups that require overload once in a while to grow. Try something between the two: heavy weight/low reps and low weight/high reps and see which gives you the best results. Most will find a combination of the two gives optimal calve growth.

5 Foot placement:

A lot of people think that you can hit different parts of the calves depending on whether you point your feet inward, straight ahead or outwards. People who turn their feet at extreme angles are actually reducing the effectiveness of the exercise and also putting a lot of stress on the joints and tissues in the knees and ankles.

6 Not isolate and contract the muscles:

In order to get the full benefit of the calf raise you need to emphasis the contraction at the top of the exercise. Focus on flexing hard at the top of each rep and it will make all the difference in your workout.

Once you’ve contracted properly at the top of the rep it doesn’t mean you can drop the weight down to the beginning. Lower the weight slowly and under control and do this for each rep.

Each part of the rep should be under control. Taking your time throughout each rep will increase the amount of time your calves are under tension, even when using the same weights and reps you normally do.


7 Skipping stretching:

You might feel pain, but there is another reason to stretch; it stretches out the fascia, a thin connective tissue “cocoon” around each muscle, which can get very tight and compress the muscle. This creates a compacting effect on the muscle so it cannot expand and grow as effectively.

You also need to fully stretch your calves between sets and immediately after training them. This increases mobility, enlarges the fascia and boosts the pump, which in turn aids recovery and growth.


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Friday, September 13, 2019

10 Most Effective Exercises For Bigger Triceps

Add serious size to your upper arms with these beginner, intermediate and advanced triceps exercises.



an arms workout that isn’t worthy of you and your (soon-to-be) mighty arms-enal. The triceps make up the majority of the muscle mass in your upper arms, which means if you’re chasing sleeve-busting muscles, you need to be doing triceps exercises regularly.

Training your triceps isn’t just about aesthetics either, as Olu Adepitan, head of fitness at BXR London, explains. “Not only do well developed triceps look good, but they can also enhance sporting performance, because of the association of triceps strength with punch power or throwing a ball at speed.


Overhand Barbell Extension : 

set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


2 Overhand Dumbbell Extension : 



set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


3 Dumbbell Extension :



set 1 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 10 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 08 reps / 30 sec


4 Overhand Bumbbell Extension :




set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


5 Close Grip Bench Press :



set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


6 Decline Skull Crusher : 




set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


7 Overhead Barbell Triceps Extension :



set 1 : 15 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 10 reps / 30 sec


8 Bench Dip :



set 1 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 12 reps / 30 sec


9 Dumbbell Kickback :



set 1 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 10 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 08 reps / 30 sec


10 Selectorized Triceps Extension :




set 1 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 2 : 12 reps / 30 sec

set 3 : 12 reps / 30 sec
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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

The Best Complete Upper-Body Dumbbell Workout

Tone muscles in your chest and the back of your shoulders and arms with these easy upper-body exercises.



Upper-Body Dumbbell Workout

One-Arm Dumbbell Row (Lower lats) 4 Sets x 6, 6, 10, 10 Reps

Flat-Bench Dumbbell Press (Pecs) 4 Sets x 6, 6, 10, 10 Reps

Seated Overhead Dumbbell Press (All three delt heads) 4 Sets x 8, 8, 12, 12 Reps

Dumbbell Shrug (Upper traps) 3 Sets x 8, 8, 8 Reps

Seated One-Arm Overhead Dumbbell Extension (Triceps long head) 2 Sets x 10, 10 Reps


 Alternating Dumbbell Curl (Both biceps heads) 2 Sets x 10, 10 Reps

Dumbbell Wrist Curl (Brachioradialis) 2 Sets x 12, 12 Reps

* Doesn’t include warm-up sets; do as many as you need but never take warm-up sets to muscle failure.

* Select a weight that causes you to fail in the designated rep range.



One-Arm Dumbbell Row






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Training one arm at a time with this move proves unparalleled for growth. Because you can use a little body english, you can actually recruit more muscle fibers and generate more force than when using both arms simultaneously in the barbell bent-over version.

Do it Right: Lean forward at the waist, and place one knee and the same-side hand on a flat bench. Keep your other foot on the floor beside the bench and grasp a dumbbell in the same-side hand, allowing the weight to hang straight down with your arm fully extended. Pull the weight toward your hip, keeping your elbow in close. Pull your elbow as far back as you can, squeezing your shoulder blades together for a full contraction, then lower the dumbbell along the same path. Repeat for reps, then switch arms.

Power Pointer: A common mistake is to bring the dumbbell straight up to the shoulder. However, the best line of pull is up and back toward your hip. That provides a greater range of motion and time under tension for the stubborn lower lats.


Flat-Bench Dumbbell Press






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This multijoint chest exercise is a proven mass-builder. Although you’ll quickly discover if one side of your pecs is stronger than the other, you get a longer range of motion over the barbell version because you can press both up and in rather than just up.

Do it Right: Lie faceup on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand just outside your shoulders. Powerfully press the weights up and together, stopping when they’re an inch or so away from touching. Slowly return to the start.

Power Pointer: Don’t let the dumbbells touch at the top, because you’ll release tension on the pecs and start getting into the habit of resting briefly at the top of each rep. Leave a few inches between the weights so your pecs don’t get a chance to relax.


Seated Overhead Dumbbell Press






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Because you don’t have a bar in your hands, you can draw your elbows all the way back outside your ears. That places more emphasis on the middle delts, the one delt head that makes you appear wider. In contrast, with a barbell your elbows have to travel forward so the bar clears your face, calling upon more front delts than middle delts.
Do it Right: Adjust the bench so your back is fully supported and upright, and grasp a dumbbell in each hand above shoulder level with a pronated grip (palms facing forward). Strongly press the weights overhead in an arc, but don’t let them touch at the top. Lower under control back to the start.
Power Pointer: Don’t stop the downward motion when your arms form 90-degree angles; instead, bring the dumbbells all the way down until your elbows point toward the floor and the weights are just above shoulder level. It’s safe for your shoulders, and you recruit more muscle fibers when using this greater range of motion.

Dumbbell Shrug






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The range of motion here is only a few inches. The up-and-down movement should be fluid and controlled, not explosive. Because you’re using dumbbells, the neutral (palms-in) grip helps keep your arms and shoulders in the most comfortable and safest position possible.
Do it Right: Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand at your sides with your palms facing in. Keeping your chest up and abs tight, shrug your shoulders straight up toward the ceiling, squeezing your traps at the top. Slowly reverse the motion, letting the weights lower your shoulders as far as possible.
Power Pointer: Avoid rolling your shoulders — it doesn’t engage the upper traps more successfully and can actually cause severe strain of the delicate rotator-cuff muscles. Keep the motion strictly up and down.

Seated One-Arm Overhead Dumbbell Extension






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With your arm overhead, you’ll better engage the largest and most dominant muscle on the back of the arm, the meaty long head of the triceps. That’s true no matter what kind of equipment you use — cable, barbell or dumbbell.
Do it Right: Sit erect on an upright bench, feet flat on the floor. Grasp a dumbbell and hold it overhead at full arm extension. Bending only your elbow, lower the weight behind your head until your arm forms a 90-degree angle. Feel your triceps stretch, then press back up to full-arm extension and squeeze your tri’s hard at the top. Repeat for reps, then switch arms.
Power Pointer: Try the two-arm version, too, but keep your elbows in tight. Allowing them to flare out wide reduces the muscular stress on the triceps.

Alternating Dumbbell Curl






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Unlike the barbell curl, the alternating dumbbell curl allows you to perform what’s called supination at the top of each rep. Starting with a palms-in (neutral) grip, you can slowly turn your wrists as you approach the top of the move, and that twisting motion allows for a better peak contraction and overall growth.

Do it Right: Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand at your sides. Keeping your chest up and elbows in tight, curl one weight toward the same-side shoulder, turning your wrist up as you go. Squeeze your biceps hard at the top, then lower to the start. Repeat with the opposite arm.

Power Pointer: Of all the ways to perform this movement wrong, the most common is to try to bring the weight as high as possible, which pulls your elbow away from your side. However, this recruits the front delts and lessens the isolation on the biceps. Keep those elbows back!


Dumbbell Wrist Curl






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The wrist curl goes last, and that’s no accident. If you hit your forearms too early in your workout, they’ll fatigue and prevent you from maintaining a good grip when training larger muscles like the back and biceps. This puts those bodyparts at a disadvantage because they rely on the forearms to be fresh.

Do it Right: Sit at the end of a bench with your forearms flat on it, and grasp a dumbbell in each hand with your palms up. Allow the weights to roll to your fingers, then use your wrists to curl the dumbbells back to the start.
Power Pointer: For a greater range of motion and stretch on the brachioradialis, keep your thumb on the same side of the dumbbell handle as your fingers. This ensures that you fully engage as much of the lower forearm as possible.

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Tuesday, September 3, 2019

The Unconventional Workout for Arm Size - bodybuilding110

For lots of guys, arm training can become stale and mundane. The old standards work at first, but after a while your body can adapt, causing strength and muscle growth to come to a halt Opens a New Window. . When that happens, you need to find new ways to challenge your arms strength and get them to grow.



Sound familiar? It’s time for your typical routine to take a back seat while you bust through plateaus with something new. Utilize these exercises.Be ready to have some tighter sleeves on your shirts with this one.



Exercise 1: Chin-Ups


This is considered the king of arm exercises for a couple of reasons. The supinated grip (palms facing you) will stimulate the biceps like no one’s business. Beyond that, things get a bit more technical. The brachialis muscle sits under the biceps muscles and is typically more difficult to target using conventional curls. When it’s developed, it contributes to building the coveted “peak” so many athletes are after.




The good news is that doing work from overhead places a pre-stretch on this muscle and therefore targets it much more effectively. For evidence of this, find some high-level competitive gymnasts and examine their biceps development and peak. Regardless of overall size, they likely have otherworldly development in this area. The frequency and volume of their overhead pulling (as part of their athletic programming) speaks for itself where the gun show is concerned.



To take things a step further, it’s not just a matter of doing chin-ups. And, in a departure from good training advice, we’ll offer this.




Abandoning good back-dominant form in favor of just pulling with the arms would actually be a smart move if you really want the biceps and brachialis to work hard. Just sayin.



Exercise 2: Dips



Compound exercises create more muscle. Who knew? By including dips in your workout, you’re allowing for a greater overload on the triceps than you normally would in isolation. Plus, you are training your triceps to work in concert with other muscles, which satisfies the performance-trainer sect mentioned in the beginning of this article. The dip, which also can be trained to greater overload using a weighted vest or dipping belt, emphasizes that ever-visible outer head of the triceps.




In order to keep the triceps fully engaged and to minimize the contribution from the pecs, it’s important to keep your body posture as upright as possible and your elbows tight to the body throughout.



Exercise 3: Band-Resisted Curls




If you’re a sucker for biceps curls and need them to be in your program, then upping the octane by attaching some bands to your barbell or dumbbells would be a smart move. The science here is simple: In most weight-bearing exercises, there are different parts to the force curve. The amount of effort your muscles have to go through isn’t equal as you progress through the rep. In conventional curls, the biceps usually have very little work to do in the last 15 to 20 degrees of the movement. The hard part comes from the fully extended arm position until just inside 90 degrees.




Since bands increase in tension as you stretch them — a principle known as linear variable tension — they’re the perfect additives to make the final segment of your curls more stimulating for the arms. Wrap one end of a band around your dumbbells or barbell, and stand on the band creating adequate tension. Next, go to town and curl to oblivion. As an added bonus, feel free to drop the bands off mid-set and burn out with just the weights for a great hybrid set. As an alternative, you also can try dedicated band training with a cool set like the SPRI Exertube Heavy.



Exercise 4: Skullcrusher Plus



Many serious trainers rely upon the conventional skullcrusher — or lying triceps extension — for triceps development. But if you’ve had to deal with elbow stress when doing this movement, understand the biomechanics of the movement rather than sidelining it altogether.



First, using gravity to your advantage can be a good initial step, so put the bench on a slight decline. This will change the force angle a bit and allow your elbows to point back farther naturally rather than pointing directly up or even forward. Second, remember your anatomy: The triceps have three heads. The most elusive of the three for most lifters is the long head, which is most effectively hit — you guessed it — via overhead movements. Take that tip and run with it by adding a “pullover” component to your skullcrushers.




As soon as you get to skull level with the weight on your eccentric phase, reach the weight down toward the floor by flexing at the shoulder joint to move the arms behind the head. You’ll feel a huge stretch in the triceps by doing this. Remember to keep the elbows facing forward; don’t let them flare outward. Once you feel a good stretch, reverse the movement and mimic a soccer throw-in pattern to return to the full extension position.


It’s OK if you use a touch of momentum here, but be careful. You might even consider using a lighter weight than usual. But prepare for your upper arms to be lit all the way up to your armpits.
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Friday, August 30, 2019

One Of The Best Arms Workout Ever - bodybuilding110

Having a strong set of arms is integral to maintaining a healthy and balanced life. Weak arms in the past meant a man couldn’t carry his kill while hunting (unless he had some friends to help) or might not have even been able to hurl a spear hard enough to take down a deer. And if you couldn’t do either of those, well… you’re dead.

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In the modern era, impending death due to arm weakness might not be much of a problem since we can grab a venison steak from any specialty grocery store, but having underdeveloped arms can still be a detriment to your health and well-being. Not only does having a pair of well-built arms help in carrying groceries, children, sandbags, and the like, but it also serves as a visual cue to the public that you’re the kind of guy who takes enough pride in himself and has enough care for his own health to workout regularly. And that’s not something to scoff at. Appearance and perception are huge factors when it comes to our identity, and having a set of well-built arms goes a long way toward inspiring confidence and self-esteem.

In this article, we’ve limited the recommended exercises to those that focus primarily on the two main muscle groups of the arms: the triceps and biceps. We have reserved shoulder and forearm exercises for an altogether separate informative guide. So, if you’re looking for shoulder exercises, keep looking, but if you’ve come for the gun show, stay the course and read on for the best arm exercises for men.




1. Workout Supersets

1. Close Grip Bench Press: 3 sets of 5-6 reps– superset with 2. Close Grip Chin-ups: 3 sets of 5-6 reps
3. Triceps Dips: 3 sets of 10 reps– superset with 4. EZ Barbell Curl: 3 sets of 10 reps

5. Dumbbell Triceps Extension: 3 sets of 12-15 reps– superset with 6. Seated Dumbbell Curls: 3 sets of 12-15 reps

Close Grip Bench Press



This is probably the single best exercise for building strength and mass in your triceps. Because of the nature of the exercise, you will be able to use big weights. Increase the weights on every set and use a weight that you can push 5-6 times to failure in the last set. Rest 30 seconds after every set and quickly switch to close grip chin-ups.

  • Lie back on a flat bench. Using a close grip (around shoulder width), lift the bar from the rack and hold it straight over you with your arms locked.
  • As you breathe in, come down slowly until you feel the bar on your middle chest.
  • After a second pause, bring the bar back to the starting position as you breathe out and push the bar using your triceps muscles. Lock your arms in the contracted position, hold for a second and then start coming down slowly again.
  • Repeat the movement for the prescribed amount of repetitions.
  • When you are done, place the bar back in the rack

Close Grip Chin-ups



While chin-ups are primarily a great back exercise, close grip chin-ups work the biceps big time. Try to swing as little as possible and concentrate on pulling with your arms instead of your back.

Triceps Dips


 The second best exercise for building strong and bigger triceps. You should use narrow grip and not let your shoulders drop below your elbows on your way down. If the dips are too hard you can use the dip machine.

EZ Barbell Curl


 The EZ Bar is better than a straight bar because the way you grip it puts both your wrists and elbows in a more natural position than a straight bar. Increase the weight on every set and choose a weight that allows you to do 10 reps to failure on the last set.

Dumbbell Triceps Extension


This is an isolation movement, a great finishing exercise. Remember this is your final exercise so keep the weight lower and just keep the blood flowing in the triceps.

Seated Dumbbell Curls



A great unilateral exercise that is going to give you a great pump in your biceps. Keep the weights low and do 3 sets of 10-12 reps.
As with any other muscle group you should give the arms a good amount of time to rest, especially since they are involved in all other upper body movements such as bench press, rows or pull ups.
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Thursday, August 22, 2019

5 High Protein Breafast For Muscle Gains - bodybuilding110

The saying "breakfast is the most important meal of the day" may not be entirely true, but breakfast is certainly important when it comes to building muscle. A large breakfast packed with protein and complex carbs is a key feature in any muscle-building plan, according to trainer Greg Merrit and sports scientist Jim Stoppani. Tailor your breakfast for super gains in size and strength.



 Hard Boiled Eggs and Ezekiel Bread

Eggs offer a great amount of high-quality protein, vitamins such as A, E, K and B, riboflavin, folic acid, minerals like calcium, zinc and iron… the list goes on! The muscle-building power of eggs is unmatched, as the yellow orbs contain all essential amino acids needed for optimal muscle recovery and muscle growth. And it’s also convenient as it gets! The most easily-portable variant is the boiled egg, of course, so we suggest you to prepare a power combo of 3 large eggs (with yolks!) and two slices of Ezekiel bread with your favorite low-calorie jelly for a real morning energy punch.

Protein: 31g, Carbs: 30g, Fats: 17g, Calories: 400

 Cottage Cheese and Fruit

Together with Greek yogurt, cottage cheese is one of the most convenient and versatile high-protein foods that deserve their place on a bodybuilder’s breakfast menu, and it’s also a good source of calcium and vitamin A. Combine 1 cup of low-fat cottage cheese with no added sodium with slices of your favorite fiber-rich fruit such as peaches, apples, strawberries or even bananas. Adding a whopping 30 grams of protein to your morning meal has never been easier.

Protein: 30g, Carbs: 50g, Fats: 3g, Calories: 200

Greek Yogurt Combo

Greek yogurt has become all the rage with healthy people who want to have their protein and enjoy it too! Compared to most other yogurt brands, Greek yogurt delivers the most protein, and there are countless ways to combine it with other muscle-friendly foods and prepare a tasty breakfast. Buy plain Greek yogurt to avoid added sugars, and combine one cup of it with ½ cup of oats and some vanilla extract, then let the mixture sit in the refrigerator overnight. In the morning, mix in a handful of fresh or frozen fiber-rich berries and 1 scoop of vanilla whey protein. Ta-da.

Protein: 48g, Carbs: 40g, Fats: 2g, Calories: 390

Veggie and Egg Scramble

As we mentioned before, eggs are loaded of muscle-building protein and healthy fats that help your organism function optimally, fuel your body and allow you to build lean muscle faster, and there are so many amazing ways to translate this muscle-building awesomeness into a tasty meal! If you’re looking for a low-carb breakfast recipe that will keep you full and lean, don’t overthink it – the basic veggie and egg scramble will give you all you need to stay healthy, satisfied and growing like a beast! Scramble 3 large eggs and add in ¼ cup of low-fat cheese and vegetables such as spinach, sliced tomatoes, peppers and mushrooms.

Protein: 26g, Carbs: 12g, Fats: 16g, Calories: 290

 Protein-Packed Oatmeal

Packed with complex carbs, oatmeal is probably one of the most popular breakfast meals in the world – being relatively neutral in taste, it can be a great base on which to play around with flavors and toppings, it’s easy to prepare and it’s chock full of fiber which supports weight loss! The best part of it all is that you can easily take your regular morning bowl of oatmeal to the next level by adding some protein and use it to build more lean muscle! Here’s how: combine ½ cup of quick oats with 1 tablespoon of peanut butter, 1 teaspoon of cinnamon and ½ cup of low-fat milk. Microwave it for one minute, then mix in one scoop of vanilla whey protein powder.

Protein: 32g, Carbs: 35g, Fats: 12g, Calories: 300
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Monday, August 19, 2019

10 Minute Home Bodyweight Abs Crusher Workout - bodybuilding110

Ready to give the heavy iron a rest? Put your own bodyweight to work—and start forging that six-pack—with these challenging, core-strength-enhancing exercises. Get ripped abs, shredded obliques and make your core strong. This exercise targets the obliques but you will also work all of the abdominal muscles and core with just with your body weight.




1. Hollow plank



Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It works your all abs muscles, including the deep-lying stability muscles, as well as strengthening your lower back.
How To:

  • Lie on your back with your arms and legs fully extended.
  • Contract your abs and raise your hands and feet off the floor.
  • Maintain this tension on your core for 20 seconds without letting your hands or feet touch the floor.

2. Plank side-to-side feet jump and tuck



 
Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It works your upper and lower abs, as well as your obliques (side abs).
How To:

  • Start in the top of the press-up position, then jump your feet forwards so your knees come towards your hands.
  • From there kick your legs back and to one side, then bring your knees back into the middle and then out to the other side.
  • Focus on keeping each jump smooth while maintaining tension on your working muscles.

3. Bicycle crunch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It primarily works your obliques, but your upper and lower abs are also heavily recruited to keep your upper back and feet up off the floor.

How To:

  • Lie on your back, then crunch your torso up while lifting your feet from the floor.
  • Crunch and twist your torso so your elbow comes forwards while bringing in the opposite knee, so they meet over your body.
  • Reverse the move to the start position, then repeat with the opposite elbow and knee, making sure you keep your feet off the floor for the full 20 seconds.

4. Rolling plank


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: A tough variation on the classic plank that places more emphasis on your obliques.

How To:

  • Start in the plank, resting on your forearms with your elbows under your shoulders.
  • Roll to one side so that your hip touches the floor, then roll back to the other side so that hip touches the floor.
  • Repeat, keeping the movement slow and controlled.

5. Heel touch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: Far harder than it looks, this move works your upper abs and obliques.
How To:

  • Lie with your upper back off the ground, knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Crunch and reach forwards with one straight arm to touch your ankle, then go back to the start and repeat on the other side.
  • Keep your upper back off the floor throughout.

6. Side plank crunch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: Another move that works your obliques, while the crunch movement recruits the small stabilising muscles to keep you balanced.
How To:

  • Start in a side plank position resting on one forearm, with your elbow under your shoulder.
  • Hold your top arm straight out next to your head with your top leg raised.
  • Contract your abs to bring your elbow and knee together, then straighten both back out.
  • Swaps sides for the second set.

7. Legs-together hip thrust



Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: One of the hardest and best ways to work your lower abs, which is crucial if you want to turn a four-pack into a six-pack.
How To:

  • Lie on your back with your legs together and raised off the floor, and your arms straight and on the floor.
  • Contract your abs to lift and raise your glutes and lower back off the floor.
  • Hold this position at the top, then lower back to the start and repeat.

8. Press-up kick-out


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: A challenging but rewarding move that works your chest and shoulders as well as your abs.
How To:

  • Perform a press-up then, as you return to the start position, go onto one hand to raise your torso and kick your leg through.
  • Return to the start position, do another press-up, then repeat but kick through to the other side.
  • Keep each rep smooth and controlled and make sure your abs are fully engaged to prevent yourself from falling over.

9. Plank with leg raise


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec

Why: Raising your legs alternately will force your entire core to remain activated for the full 20 seconds of work.
How To:

  • Start in the plank position, resting on your forearms with your elbows under your shoulders.
  • Brace your core, then raise one foot as high as you can, keeping your leg straight.
  • Lower it again, then raise your other leg.
  • Keep each rep smooth and controlled, and hold your foot in the top position briefly to really work the abs hard.





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Sunday, August 18, 2019

The 12 Best Bicep and Tricep Exercises for Mass - bodybuilding110

There’s a certain fascination people have with building bulging biceps, however, many don’t know how to go about achieving these results and become faced with a muscle-growth plateau.

Often, you see people mindlessly curling away for hours on end only to end up with little or no gains in muscle size.

In this article, we’ll break down the various muscles of the upper arm and provide you with the 6 best exercises to really pack on the mass.




In order to build a set of show-stopping arms, you first need to know the muscles you’re going to be training and the functions they perform.

The upper arm is made up of two major muscle groups:

   -  The Biceps

Your biceps are made up of the long head (outer) and the short head (inner) and make up 1/3 of the upper arms.

    - The Triceps

The triceps, as the name implies is made up of three heads – the long head, short head and medial head. It also makes up 2/3 of the upper arm, which may come as a surprise to those thinking that the key to bigger arms is working on your biceps.

In order to train the arms for maximal growth, you need to make sure that you’re targeting each head of each muscle with a specific set of exercises. Sadly, endless curls are not the secret.

The following 12 exercises, in my opinion, are the best ones for targeting each head.



Spider Curls





 



 Begin this exercise by putting the bar on the sitting part of the preacher bench. Make sure it’s balanced so it doesn’t fall off. Then, step to the forward part of the bench, where you would usually put your arms and lay on your stomach at 45 degrees against the front side of the bench. Your feet and more importantly your toes, have to be well positioned on the floor and your upper arms need to be on top of the inside pad on the preacher bench. Then, take the barbell or dumbbells while holding a supinated grip with your palms upwards. Your arms should be about as wide as your shoulders or a bit closer, but never wider. Lift and exhale, hold for a second and squeeze your biceps, after which you should bring the bar or dumbbells down, while breathing in. Do 4 sets of spider curls, with 12, 8, 6 and 15 reps each, respectively.

Incline Dumbbell Curls

 Sit on an incline bench and have two dumbbells in your hands, at arm’s length. Your elbows need to be close to your body and your palms need to be facing forward. Remember, nothing above your elbow should move. You are curling the weights forward and contracting your biceps. Breathe out while you curl upwards and breathe in as you lower the weights back up. When you’ve raised the dumbbells to shoulder level, hold that position for a second and bring them back down. Do incline dumbbell curls for 2 sets of 8 reps each and a final set of 6 reps each.
 

Barbell Curls

 Stand with a barbell in your hands at shoulder width and with your back straight. Your palms should be facing forward and your elbows should be close to your body. Contract the biceps and lift the barbell, moving only your forearms while breathing out. Lift into a curl until your biceps are completely contracted and the bar is at your shoulders, then hold the position for a second and squeeze your biceps. Bring the bar down and breathe in. Do barbell curls for 2 sets of 8 reps each and a final set of 12 reps.

Preacher Curls

 

 Get an EZ curl bar and find a preacher bench. Hold the E-Z bar at the close inner handle. If possible, have someone hand you the bar, or you can take it from the front bar rest installed in a lot of preacher benches. Your palms should be facing forwards and they should be tilted just a little bit inward to adjust to the bar’s shape. Your upper arms need to be placed on the preacher bench pad, as well as your chest. Your starting position should be your E-Z curl bar in your hands, at shoulder length. Breathe in and lower the bar until your biceps are completely stretched and your arms are fully straight. Exhale and curl the weight back up with your biceps until they are completely contracted and the bar is positioned at shoulder height. Squeeze your biceps and keep that position for a second. Do one dropset of preacher curls until you reach muscle failure.
 

Triceps Pushdown

 Get a rope, a straight bar or an angled one and attach your handle of choice to a high pulley. Take it with an overhand grip with your palms facing down. Your grip should be as wide as your shoulders, and your back should be straight with a slight tilt forward. Your upper arms should be close to your torso and at a 90 degree angle to the floor, while your forearms should be pointing upwards towards the pulley, holding the bar or rope. While exhaling, pull the bar down with your triceps until it touches your thighs and your arms are completely extended and holding a 90 degree angle to the floor. Your upper arms should stay right next to your torso, completely immobile. Hold the position for a second and breathe in while you bring the bar or rope back to its starting position. Do 4 sets of triceps pushdowns – the first one with 12 reps and three consecutive ones with 8 reps each.

Seated Triceps Press

 Sit on a bench that will let you support your back on it. Take a dumbbell in both of your hands and hold it over your head with your arms outstretched. The intensity should be in your palms, while they face inwards. Keep your arms close to your head with your elbows inside, perpendicular to the floor. Breathe in and lower the dumbbell behind your head in a semi-circular movement until your forearms connect with your biceps. Breathe out and raise the dumbbell to its starting position. Do 3 sets of seated triceps presses with the first set having 10 reps and the last two having 8 reps each.

Low Cable Triceps Extensions

 

Choose your weight and lay down on the bench of a seated row machine with a rope. Your head should be on the side of the machine, not away from it. Take the ends of the rope with your palms facing each other in a neutral grip and have your forearms perpendicular to your upper arms, which should be perpendicular themselves, in relation to your torso. Breathe out and extend your lower arms until they are completely vertical and straight. Your upper arms and elbows should be stationary all the way through the exercise, with only your forearms moving. When you reach the peak of the movement, contract your triceps, breathe in and return to the starting position. Do 2 sets of low cable triceps extensions with 12 reps each, as well as a final set of 15 reps.

Lying Dumbbell Triceps Extensions

 

  Lie down on a flat bench and get dumbbells in your hands. Your arms should be fully extended and perpendicular to your body. Your palms should be facing in and towards each other, and they should be tucked in. Breathe in and lower the dumbbells until they are near the sides of your head without moving anything below the elbow, so only the forearms should move. Breathe out and lift with your triceps back to the starting position. Do 3 sets of lying dumbbell triceps extensions, with the first two having 15 reps each and the last one 20 reps.
 

Seated Palms-Down Barbell Wrist Curl

 Take a barbell with both of your hands and your palms facing downwards. Your hands should be positioned at shoulder width and your feet should be flat on the floor and a bit wider. Lean forwards and put your forearms on your upper thighs, still keeping your downward grip. Holding tightly, inhale and lower the bar as quickly as possible. Then, curl the weight up as high as possible while flexing your forearms, which should still be positioned on your thighs without moving. Hold the contraction for a second and go back to the starting position. Do seated palms-down barbell wrist curls for 4 sets of 25 reps.
 

Standing Palms-Up Barbell Behind The Back Wrist Curl

 While the name might be a mouthful, it’s a relatively simple exercise. Stand with a straight back and a barbell behind your glutes at arm length. You will need to use a pronated grip in this exercise, which means your palms should be facing away from your body, and your hands should be apart at shoulder width. Look straight forward with your feet at shoulder width as well. Exhale and lift the barbell with a little curl in your wrist and a semi-circular movement upwards. Hold the contraction for a second, then inhale and lower the barbell to its starting position. Do this exercise for 3 sets of 15 reps each, and when you’re done make sure to put the barbell down on the squat rack or the floor while bending your knees, because it would be rather difficult to do it otherwise.

Reverse Barbell Curls

 Stand with a straight back and hold a barbell at shoulder width, and your elbows tightly packed in. Your palms should be facing down for a pronated grip. While keeping your upper arms stationary, curl the weights and contract your biceps while breathing out. Your forearms are the only part of your body that should move in this exercise. Keep doing the movement until your biceps are completely contracted and the bar is at shoulder height. Hold the position for a second and squeeze your biceps. Breathe in and slowly put the bar back down to its previous position. Do 3 sets of reverse barbell curls for 15 reps each!
 

Hammer Curls

 Stand with a straight back and a dumbbell in each of your palms, at arm’s length. Your elbows should be close to your body, but not packed in. Keep your upper arm stationary, exhale and lift the weight in a curl while contracting your biceps and keep lifting it until it’s fully contracted. At this point, the dumbbells should be at shoulder height. Keep this position for a second and squeeze your biceps. After a second, inhale and lower the dumbbells down into their starting position. Do up to two sets of hammer curls, all the way to muscle failure!
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