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Monday, August 19, 2019

10 Minute Home Bodyweight Abs Crusher Workout - bodybuilding110

Ready to give the heavy iron a rest? Put your own bodyweight to work—and start forging that six-pack—with these challenging, core-strength-enhancing exercises. Get ripped abs, shredded obliques and make your core strong. This exercise targets the obliques but you will also work all of the abdominal muscles and core with just with your body weight.




1. Hollow plank



Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It works your all abs muscles, including the deep-lying stability muscles, as well as strengthening your lower back.
How To:

  • Lie on your back with your arms and legs fully extended.
  • Contract your abs and raise your hands and feet off the floor.
  • Maintain this tension on your core for 20 seconds without letting your hands or feet touch the floor.

2. Plank side-to-side feet jump and tuck



 
Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It works your upper and lower abs, as well as your obliques (side abs).
How To:

  • Start in the top of the press-up position, then jump your feet forwards so your knees come towards your hands.
  • From there kick your legs back and to one side, then bring your knees back into the middle and then out to the other side.
  • Focus on keeping each jump smooth while maintaining tension on your working muscles.

3. Bicycle crunch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: It primarily works your obliques, but your upper and lower abs are also heavily recruited to keep your upper back and feet up off the floor.

How To:

  • Lie on your back, then crunch your torso up while lifting your feet from the floor.
  • Crunch and twist your torso so your elbow comes forwards while bringing in the opposite knee, so they meet over your body.
  • Reverse the move to the start position, then repeat with the opposite elbow and knee, making sure you keep your feet off the floor for the full 20 seconds.

4. Rolling plank


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: A tough variation on the classic plank that places more emphasis on your obliques.

How To:

  • Start in the plank, resting on your forearms with your elbows under your shoulders.
  • Roll to one side so that your hip touches the floor, then roll back to the other side so that hip touches the floor.
  • Repeat, keeping the movement slow and controlled.

5. Heel touch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: Far harder than it looks, this move works your upper abs and obliques.
How To:

  • Lie with your upper back off the ground, knees bent and feet flat on the floor.
  • Crunch and reach forwards with one straight arm to touch your ankle, then go back to the start and repeat on the other side.
  • Keep your upper back off the floor throughout.

6. Side plank crunch


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: Another move that works your obliques, while the crunch movement recruits the small stabilising muscles to keep you balanced.
How To:

  • Start in a side plank position resting on one forearm, with your elbow under your shoulder.
  • Hold your top arm straight out next to your head with your top leg raised.
  • Contract your abs to bring your elbow and knee together, then straighten both back out.
  • Swaps sides for the second set.

7. Legs-together hip thrust



Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: One of the hardest and best ways to work your lower abs, which is crucial if you want to turn a four-pack into a six-pack.
How To:

  • Lie on your back with your legs together and raised off the floor, and your arms straight and on the floor.
  • Contract your abs to lift and raise your glutes and lower back off the floor.
  • Hold this position at the top, then lower back to the start and repeat.

8. Press-up kick-out


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec
Why: A challenging but rewarding move that works your chest and shoulders as well as your abs.
How To:

  • Perform a press-up then, as you return to the start position, go onto one hand to raise your torso and kick your leg through.
  • Return to the start position, do another press-up, then repeat but kick through to the other side.
  • Keep each rep smooth and controlled and make sure your abs are fully engaged to prevent yourself from falling over.

9. Plank with leg raise


Time: 20sec Rest: 10sec

Why: Raising your legs alternately will force your entire core to remain activated for the full 20 seconds of work.
How To:

  • Start in the plank position, resting on your forearms with your elbows under your shoulders.
  • Brace your core, then raise one foot as high as you can, keeping your leg straight.
  • Lower it again, then raise your other leg.
  • Keep each rep smooth and controlled, and hold your foot in the top position briefly to really work the abs hard.





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Sunday, August 18, 2019

The 12 Best Bicep and Tricep Exercises for Mass - bodybuilding110

There’s a certain fascination people have with building bulging biceps, however, many don’t know how to go about achieving these results and become faced with a muscle-growth plateau.

Often, you see people mindlessly curling away for hours on end only to end up with little or no gains in muscle size.

In this article, we’ll break down the various muscles of the upper arm and provide you with the 6 best exercises to really pack on the mass.




In order to build a set of show-stopping arms, you first need to know the muscles you’re going to be training and the functions they perform.

The upper arm is made up of two major muscle groups:

   -  The Biceps

Your biceps are made up of the long head (outer) and the short head (inner) and make up 1/3 of the upper arms.

    - The Triceps

The triceps, as the name implies is made up of three heads – the long head, short head and medial head. It also makes up 2/3 of the upper arm, which may come as a surprise to those thinking that the key to bigger arms is working on your biceps.

In order to train the arms for maximal growth, you need to make sure that you’re targeting each head of each muscle with a specific set of exercises. Sadly, endless curls are not the secret.

The following 12 exercises, in my opinion, are the best ones for targeting each head.



Spider Curls





 



 Begin this exercise by putting the bar on the sitting part of the preacher bench. Make sure it’s balanced so it doesn’t fall off. Then, step to the forward part of the bench, where you would usually put your arms and lay on your stomach at 45 degrees against the front side of the bench. Your feet and more importantly your toes, have to be well positioned on the floor and your upper arms need to be on top of the inside pad on the preacher bench. Then, take the barbell or dumbbells while holding a supinated grip with your palms upwards. Your arms should be about as wide as your shoulders or a bit closer, but never wider. Lift and exhale, hold for a second and squeeze your biceps, after which you should bring the bar or dumbbells down, while breathing in. Do 4 sets of spider curls, with 12, 8, 6 and 15 reps each, respectively.

Incline Dumbbell Curls

 Sit on an incline bench and have two dumbbells in your hands, at arm’s length. Your elbows need to be close to your body and your palms need to be facing forward. Remember, nothing above your elbow should move. You are curling the weights forward and contracting your biceps. Breathe out while you curl upwards and breathe in as you lower the weights back up. When you’ve raised the dumbbells to shoulder level, hold that position for a second and bring them back down. Do incline dumbbell curls for 2 sets of 8 reps each and a final set of 6 reps each.
 

Barbell Curls

 Stand with a barbell in your hands at shoulder width and with your back straight. Your palms should be facing forward and your elbows should be close to your body. Contract the biceps and lift the barbell, moving only your forearms while breathing out. Lift into a curl until your biceps are completely contracted and the bar is at your shoulders, then hold the position for a second and squeeze your biceps. Bring the bar down and breathe in. Do barbell curls for 2 sets of 8 reps each and a final set of 12 reps.

Preacher Curls

 

 Get an EZ curl bar and find a preacher bench. Hold the E-Z bar at the close inner handle. If possible, have someone hand you the bar, or you can take it from the front bar rest installed in a lot of preacher benches. Your palms should be facing forwards and they should be tilted just a little bit inward to adjust to the bar’s shape. Your upper arms need to be placed on the preacher bench pad, as well as your chest. Your starting position should be your E-Z curl bar in your hands, at shoulder length. Breathe in and lower the bar until your biceps are completely stretched and your arms are fully straight. Exhale and curl the weight back up with your biceps until they are completely contracted and the bar is positioned at shoulder height. Squeeze your biceps and keep that position for a second. Do one dropset of preacher curls until you reach muscle failure.
 

Triceps Pushdown

 Get a rope, a straight bar or an angled one and attach your handle of choice to a high pulley. Take it with an overhand grip with your palms facing down. Your grip should be as wide as your shoulders, and your back should be straight with a slight tilt forward. Your upper arms should be close to your torso and at a 90 degree angle to the floor, while your forearms should be pointing upwards towards the pulley, holding the bar or rope. While exhaling, pull the bar down with your triceps until it touches your thighs and your arms are completely extended and holding a 90 degree angle to the floor. Your upper arms should stay right next to your torso, completely immobile. Hold the position for a second and breathe in while you bring the bar or rope back to its starting position. Do 4 sets of triceps pushdowns – the first one with 12 reps and three consecutive ones with 8 reps each.

Seated Triceps Press

 Sit on a bench that will let you support your back on it. Take a dumbbell in both of your hands and hold it over your head with your arms outstretched. The intensity should be in your palms, while they face inwards. Keep your arms close to your head with your elbows inside, perpendicular to the floor. Breathe in and lower the dumbbell behind your head in a semi-circular movement until your forearms connect with your biceps. Breathe out and raise the dumbbell to its starting position. Do 3 sets of seated triceps presses with the first set having 10 reps and the last two having 8 reps each.

Low Cable Triceps Extensions

 

Choose your weight and lay down on the bench of a seated row machine with a rope. Your head should be on the side of the machine, not away from it. Take the ends of the rope with your palms facing each other in a neutral grip and have your forearms perpendicular to your upper arms, which should be perpendicular themselves, in relation to your torso. Breathe out and extend your lower arms until they are completely vertical and straight. Your upper arms and elbows should be stationary all the way through the exercise, with only your forearms moving. When you reach the peak of the movement, contract your triceps, breathe in and return to the starting position. Do 2 sets of low cable triceps extensions with 12 reps each, as well as a final set of 15 reps.

Lying Dumbbell Triceps Extensions

 

  Lie down on a flat bench and get dumbbells in your hands. Your arms should be fully extended and perpendicular to your body. Your palms should be facing in and towards each other, and they should be tucked in. Breathe in and lower the dumbbells until they are near the sides of your head without moving anything below the elbow, so only the forearms should move. Breathe out and lift with your triceps back to the starting position. Do 3 sets of lying dumbbell triceps extensions, with the first two having 15 reps each and the last one 20 reps.
 

Seated Palms-Down Barbell Wrist Curl

 Take a barbell with both of your hands and your palms facing downwards. Your hands should be positioned at shoulder width and your feet should be flat on the floor and a bit wider. Lean forwards and put your forearms on your upper thighs, still keeping your downward grip. Holding tightly, inhale and lower the bar as quickly as possible. Then, curl the weight up as high as possible while flexing your forearms, which should still be positioned on your thighs without moving. Hold the contraction for a second and go back to the starting position. Do seated palms-down barbell wrist curls for 4 sets of 25 reps.
 

Standing Palms-Up Barbell Behind The Back Wrist Curl

 While the name might be a mouthful, it’s a relatively simple exercise. Stand with a straight back and a barbell behind your glutes at arm length. You will need to use a pronated grip in this exercise, which means your palms should be facing away from your body, and your hands should be apart at shoulder width. Look straight forward with your feet at shoulder width as well. Exhale and lift the barbell with a little curl in your wrist and a semi-circular movement upwards. Hold the contraction for a second, then inhale and lower the barbell to its starting position. Do this exercise for 3 sets of 15 reps each, and when you’re done make sure to put the barbell down on the squat rack or the floor while bending your knees, because it would be rather difficult to do it otherwise.

Reverse Barbell Curls

 Stand with a straight back and hold a barbell at shoulder width, and your elbows tightly packed in. Your palms should be facing down for a pronated grip. While keeping your upper arms stationary, curl the weights and contract your biceps while breathing out. Your forearms are the only part of your body that should move in this exercise. Keep doing the movement until your biceps are completely contracted and the bar is at shoulder height. Hold the position for a second and squeeze your biceps. Breathe in and slowly put the bar back down to its previous position. Do 3 sets of reverse barbell curls for 15 reps each!
 

Hammer Curls

 Stand with a straight back and a dumbbell in each of your palms, at arm’s length. Your elbows should be close to your body, but not packed in. Keep your upper arm stationary, exhale and lift the weight in a curl while contracting your biceps and keep lifting it until it’s fully contracted. At this point, the dumbbells should be at shoulder height. Keep this position for a second and squeeze your biceps. After a second, inhale and lower the dumbbells down into their starting position. Do up to two sets of hammer curls, all the way to muscle failure!
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Friday, August 16, 2019

5 Killer Exercises to Tone Your Lower Pecs - bodybuilding110

If you are working on the aesthetics of your upper body – then ignoring the lower chest workouts in isolation is a big mistake. All your hard work of getting a chiseled upper chest will go to waste.

In this article, we will tell you why it is important to work on your lower chest and what workouts you can do to get the well-rounded lower pecs.





The First Lower Pec Exercise :







 
set 1 : 10 reps
set 2 : 10 reps
set 3 : 10 reps

The Second Lower Pec Exercise :


 set 1 : 10 reps
set 2 : 10 reps
set 3 : 10 reps

The Third Lower Pec Exercise :


set 1 : 10 reps
set 2 : 10 reps
set 3 : 10 reps

The Fourth Lower Pec Exercise :



set 1 : 10 reps
set 2 : 10 reps
set 3 : 10 reps

The Fifth Lower Pec Exercise :


set 1 : 10 reps
set 2 : 10 reps
set 3 : 10 reps
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Thursday, August 8, 2019

How To Build Bigger Lats – Latissimus Dorsi Workout - bodybuilding110

Your back includes some of the largest muscles in the body, muscles that are used every day to support your spine and body. The back muscles also make up some of the muscles of the core, particularly the lats.



Developing these muscles will not only give your body great proportion, it will help you have a strong, sturdy base for all kinds of daily activities.

The lats, aka the latissimus dorsi, are the large muscles of the back. These muscles are located on either side of the back and travel from the back of the shoulder all the way down to the hips.

The lat muscles are involved in pulling motions, like pulling open a door or, in exercise, doing a pull-up.

Because of that movement, typical lat exercises involve a pulling or rowing motion. The following exercises show a variety of ways you can work the lat muscles using dumbbells and resistance bands.

Keep in mind these are large muscles so you can typically use a heavier weight, depending on the exercise.

CHIN-UPS
will do a great job at this task. Find a pull-up bar, position your hands on it at shoulder width and start lifting all the way up until you reach your clavicle, just below your chin and above your breastbone. You don’t need any machines or equipment other than a pull-up bar, which you can buy online and attach to your door frame with relative ease.

LAT PULLDOWNS are also an awesome exercise to activate your lats. Take a supinated grip on a lat pulldown machine with a normal lat pulldown bar. Your arms should be positioned at shoulder width, which will let your shoulders stay safe in a position of external rotation. Also, make sure to keep your chest up – don’t let it fall while you’re doing the movement.

Your lat exercises should end with a shoulder adduction to get the optimal results. If you look at the angle of the muscle fibers, you can also figure out the angle at which you need to do your rowing movements to optimize their effectiveness as well. Isolation exercises will get this done, which is why I prefer the single arm row on a cable machine – it places a perpetual tension on the lats and boosts muscle gains. The cable should be at eye level and should be pulled into position below your sternum. You can do this on a bench for extra stability when you’re lifting a lot of weight. Since this is an exercise that targets only a few muscles, your body shouldn’t move to make sure that the lats are getting all the attention they need.

WORKOUT

For best effect, do two sets of chin-ups or pulldowns with a supinated grip for six to ten reps and one set of single arm rows on a cable machine for eight to twelve reps. Pay extra attention to the first exercise since you can focus more on your muscle contractions. Finally, make sure to add weight whenever you feel that the current one is too light and you can do the exercise with relative ease. Doing this will ensure that you keep your gains constant and your muscles as stressed as possible. Make sure to always practice proper form too.
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Monday, August 5, 2019

The Only 3 Exercises You Need To Do To Develop Monstrous Delts - bodybuilding110

For most people, shoulders are simply an accessory muscle that they work at the end of their chest day or mix in on another day. I know and watch several people at the gym do a few presses and mix in a few front and side raises and then call it a day. Some of these people work hard when they do their shoulder workout but simply put, treating your caps like an accessory muscle isn’t going to get your the kind of shoulder muscles that turn heads.



But when it comes to deltoid training all people think about is the classic overhead presses. No doubt it is a great exercise for your shoulder strength but if you’re chasing boulder shoulders, it simply isn’t enough. Also, 3D deltoids are the hardest thing to achieve naturally. We’ve done some digging in the Bio-mechanic mines to find out the best exercises for your delt-development. 



First, Let Me Give You A Basic Insight Of Your Deltoid’s Anatomy




Now, Try These 3 Moves

1) Side Lateral Raises With Cabels (Bending Forward)

Lateral raise is a great muscle builder for your medial dletoids. However, being an isolation movement the load on your muscle fiberes is invariable throughout the range of motion and also becomes zero at some points.

Performing this exercise with cables puts constant tension over the  medial head providing maximum stimulation for maximum gains.Bend your torso little forward while alling the movement of your arm with medial deltoid fiberes makes this exercise even more effective.

Suggested sets and reps: 3 sets with 15-20 reps

2) Incline Dumbbell Lateral Raises

Every coin has 2 sides. Though cables put constant tension over your muscles, you can’t increase the load a lot. And remember progressive over-load is another important factor for hypertrohy. This version of lateral raises allows you to get strong in the movement as well as target the medial deltoid muscle fiberes effecitvely as it changes the force vector. Utilizing different angles and rep ranges when training a muscle group can be a winning stratergy.

Suggested sets and reps: 4 sets with 12-15 reps

3) Reverse Machine Flies With Half Reps For Posterior Deltoids

Now that we’ve killed the medial delts. It is time to shed some love over the posterior region of your deltoids. Reverse machine flies is the ultimate-isolatation mass builder for your rear deltoids. However, most people do it wrong. They go through a full range of motion, pinching their shoulder blades bringing the middle back, rhomboids and trapezius muscles into the equation. In order to purely isolate the posterior delt muscle fiberes perform the reverse-fly movement with half reps, that is, only till the point your arms reach your side, ensure to perform the reps slowly to get the mind and muscles connection.

Suggested sets and reps: 4 sets with 10-15 Reps
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Friday, August 2, 2019

Top 5 Ways to Avoid Dangerous Abs Rollout Mistakes

The ab wheel exercise is done by placing your hands on the bar coming through the wheel and rolling it back and forth.  Done correctly, it should give you a sufficient abdominal workout.  However, the majority of the time I witness this exercise being done, it is being done wrong!



When done wrong, the ab wheel is not just ineffective, it is unsafe and can actually harm you.  Now I know what you all are thinking, that any exercise done wrong can be dangerous.  My beef with the ab wheel is that it is a complex exercise that is not easy for a beginner to do, while other exercises are easier and can give you more benefit.

1. Take a deep breath in

Before each rep, take a deep breath into your stomach as if you were trying to fill your entire abdomen with air. Then brace your core as if you were about to take a punch.


2. Use your lats

At the beginning of each rep, tighten your lats by pulling your shoulders down and back. This helps to stabilize your spine in a manner similar to when you do a Deadlift. At the bottom position, roll yourself back to the starting position by pulling with your lats, which is a similar movement to a Straight-Arm Pulldown.


3. Start with the wheel directly under your shoulders.

To keep your core engaged,  the ab wheel or barbell should start directly under your shoulders at the start and finish of each rep.


4. Keep your shoulders and hips aligned

To perform the Rollout effectively, ensure that your hips and shoulders are aligned with the same form as a proper Plank. If your hips dip, that means you're placing unnecessary stress on your spine.


5. Avoid shooting forward with your hips

One of the worst mistakes is driving downward with your hips as you lower in the rollout. This all but guarantees you will cause your lower back to arch and take the tension out of your abs, which puts your spine at risk and decreases the training benefit. To counteract this, keep your hips straight or slightly bent throughout the exercise, and avoid driving your hips backward as you roll up to the starting position.

IN CONCLUSION:

The ab wheel exercise is simply not worth performing in the gym in terms of risk vs. reward, especially if the one performing the exercise is a beginner.  The exercise does not bring your abdominal muscles through a full range and the motion is a complex one requiring you to be hyper-aware of your form.

Not only must one be hyper-aware of their form while performing the exercise, they must also have the strength to stabilize their body while performing the movement.  If proper form is not sustained while performing the movement, injury may occur that will have your body crying out in pain and preventing you from exercising in the gym for a long period of time.
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Wednesday, July 24, 2019

5 Things To Avoid When You’re Training Chest Muscles

You want a chest that fills out your t-shirt. We get it. Join the club. But when your chest doesn't grow, things can get very frustrating.

You're not alone in this struggle, either. Everyone wants a physique that is athletic, strong and chiseled. In other words, a body that lifts well and looks even better. Unfortunately, achieving ‘that look’ only comes with hard work. There are no shortcuts.




Anyway, the chest – which mainly consists of the pectoralis major and pectoralis minor – is a notoriously difficult muscle to build. But it's not impossible, providing you follow our advice and avoid these silly mistakes.

Check out these five reasons why your chest isn’t troubling your shirt buttons.

Just Bench Pressing

 Another very common mistake which is made on chest day is solely doing pressing movements. This could be a barbell bench press, incline barbell bench press, dumbbell press etc. The point is all of these movements are pretty much identical and aren’t really ‘testing’ or giving your chest a proper all-round workout

Bench press is certainly an excellent exercise and there are many brilliant versions of it; however, they shouldn’t make up the entirety of your chest workout. If you’re lifting purely for strength, e.g. powerlifting, then you’re probably going to just be performing bench press – so it’s okay to not include isolation exercises. However, if you’re looking to build muscle mass then you should look at some other exercises

 For example, by isolating your chest with exercises such as dumbbell flys or cable crossover, then you will be hitting your chest from different angles, activating more muscle fibres and thus allowing yourself to build more muscle.

Neglecting Upper Chest

 In order to build a full, aesthetic chest muscle, you need to work your entire chest. To do this, you need to concentrate on the upper and lower portions of your chest

Simply put, you can put more emphasis on your upper chest by including incline movements into your chest routine. Likewise, to put more emphasis on your lower chest it would be beneficial to perform some decline work.

 It’s important to note that you cannot isolate your upper and lower chest like you can isolate whole muscles. The visible chest muscle is just one muscle, although you can develop different portions of it by doing different exercises.

 Remember, just by including a few incline exercises for a few workouts, it won’t magically give you an amazing upper chest. It’s important to keep at it for a long period of time and keep your body fat relatively low to see the progress you have made.

 Furthermore, if you are performing incline exercises (for example,) and you’re performing them later on in your workout, then you are never going to be able to hit them with as much intensity. Instead, you should switch up your routine by sometimes hitting incline first when you have the most energy. This way you prevent your upper chest lagging behind.

Overusing Machines

This is another common mistake which I see being made on a daily basis. For one reason or another, many lifters seem stuck to the machines in the gym. Don’t get me wrong, they have their uses, but they shouldn’t make up the majority of your workout. In fact, it should be quite the opposite.

I would stick to work with barbells and dumbbells, then implement in a one or two ‘machine’ movements such as a fly or hammer strength press.

 This way you are able to build up more of your stabiliser muscles – which are used when you lift free weights – but not when using a machine. Furthermore, you can hit your chest from different angles with free weights; however, machines are stuck in one arc, and one motion.

 One good use for machines is as a finisher, since you can easily do drop sets, or neurological overload sets, to completely fatigue your chest and totally finish it off. It’s easy to drop the weight and complete another set without faffing around taking weight off, or adding weight onto a bar.

You're Not Resting Enough

Come on guys, you know this, right? You know that your gains are made away from the gym, more often that not, fast asleep with a belly full of protein.

Without adequate R&R, your muscles will never grow. In fact, working out too hard and too often on the same body part could stunt muscle growth and actually break down tissue that you have already worked so hard on to build. #FFS.

We know it can be tempting to rock back up to the gym and hit the barbell the day after a heavy workout, but if you aren’t fully rested and your muscles haven’t totally recovered, you could fall victim to overtraining, which may result in sickness and even injury, delaying your gains even further. God loves a trier. But don't try too hard.


Constantly blitzing yourself in the gym without adequate rest will lead to overtraining and burnout. How to best avoid it? A good rule of thumb to follow: after a hard chest workout, wait at least 48 hours before training the same muscles again. Simple.

Form

The dreaded F-word. Form is important when it comes to any exercises or muscles.

Given how popular chest day is, many people forget to leave their ego at the door when they enter the gym and decide to try and lift as much weight as they possibly can.

On bench press for example, you should use a weight that you are comfortable with for your working sets, gradually increasing the weight for progressive overload. If you are only performing half reps or need a spotter to help you with most of them, then you should lighten the weight.

 Read up on how to perform each exercise properly – for example: bench press form – and get someone to critique your form. You will thank yourself for it later.

Jay Cutler once said ‘Work your muscles, not the weight’ This is very true, especially when it comes to training chest.

 You should concentrate on contracting your muscles rather than just moving the weight.
 
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