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Friday, April 8, 2016

The 8 Best Exercises Biceps and Triceps For Building

When someone asks you to flex, you don’t flex your legs or your back. You flex your ARMS.

Arms make your physique look complete. Without big arms, you don’t look like you lift weights.

As a skinny-fat teenager I was always self-conscious about the size of my arms.

When I flexed my biceps, nothing would happen.

I had no biceps peak at all, and when I touched my arm I couldn’t feel any muscle at all. It was all soft.

However, that all changed after putting in several years of hard work in the gym and at the kitchen table.


 I have written this article to share my 8 best exercises  biceps and triceps For Building.


What's the most underrated biceps movement?





The standing concentration curl with a dumbbell; it's amazing how many people do them wrong. Done correctly, it's one of the best biceps exercises and really isolates the peak, giving height to the biceps.

I do this standing in a bent-over position with one hand on my knee. The seated version is simply called a concentration curl. 


The Preacher Curls






This is the ultimate bicep exercise one can ever do. Some might detest to this just because it’s an isolation type of workout. Isolations are not always bad. Just make sure you perform some compound workouts before getting to this. But frankly speaking, this exercise will REALLY help you to focus all your energy, blood, and oxygen into your biceps to lift the weights. The way it positions the body with the seat and armrest tied together will lockout any other motion, except your arms. For this exercise, going for heavy sets and slow reputations will definitely BLAST your GUNS through the roof!






stretch it out





Seated incline dumbbell curls are one of the only ways to stretch the long head of the biceps out. When you sit on an incline your arms move behind your torso, which stretches the long head, allowing it to contract with more force. Therefore, when you do incline curls, greater emphasis is placed on the biceps long head. This is important because the long head gives your arms better shape when viewed from the side and it forms the biceps peak that pops when someone asks you to flex.

 Tip: After doing barbell curls, move on to incline curls. Try doing them as follows: Start with the incline adjusted to about 30 degrees. After reaching failure, set the bench to about 45 degrees and continue your set, only resting long enough to adjust the bench. After reaching failure at that angle increase the bench to about 60 degrees and finish the set, going to absolute muscle-burning failure. That's one set! Choose a wait that allows you to get about 10 reps on the first bench setting and do three sets in this fashion.



bring down the hammer




For years bodybuilders considered hammer curls an afterthought exercise to be done at the end of arms for the forearms and brachiaclis. Yet research has now shown that hammer curls place the greatest amount of emphasis on the biceps long head. To really bring up this critical biceps head, you must consistently do hammer curls with your biceps workouts.


 

 Tip: Try doing cross-body hammer curls. Instead of curling the weight straight out in front of your body, curl the weight in front of you at about a 45-degree angle from your torso, toward your opposites shoulder. This will place even greater emphasis on your biceps long head. 

 Triceps Pushdown






This exercise is a favorite to many in the gym, just because they can show off how strong they are by being able to lift super heavy weights with this particular exercise. The only reason behind the surprisingly heavy weights is because… they are lifting THE WRONG WAY. Most people tend to use their own body weight by leaning to the front just so they can push the weights down. But if you start pushing using the proper form, this is one of the fastest workouts you can progress in that adds visible gains to your arms.



Triceps Dips






If you want big triceps, dips are absolutely essential. Dips are fantastic for hitting all three heads at once, and they’re one of the only exercises that effectively blasts all three heads simultaneously (along with the closed-grip bench press, which is #2). Also, unlike cable exercises and a lot of other isolation triceps exercises, dips allow you to overload your triceps with a significant amount of weight. More weight lifted = more muscle gained.

Form:

Make sure to lower slowly all the way down until your triceps are parallel with the ground. At the top of the movement, squeeze your triceps hard for 1 second.

Below are two different variations. The bench dip (right) is significantly easier and a much better option for beginners. The bench dip is also a great exercise for building up endurance and really blasting your tris hard at the end of a workout. Traditional dips (left) allow the body to handle more weight, and thus are much better for building overall muscle mass. Once you’re able to get 12 reps in a set increase the weight by using a weight belt and weight plates.



 Dumbbell Kickback






Now, let’s add some detail to those arms and provide a great finishing pump to boot. Don’t worry about going heavy during this move; trying to do so could put undue stress on your shoulder joints. Instead, select a weight that you can easily manage as well as hold and squeeze at the top of each rep. For variety, also try the cable kickback.


Overhead Lateral Triceps Extension





Start by raising one arm vertically overhead. Slowly bend your arm at the elbow and lower the dumbbell sideways behind your head. Make sure to keep your upper arm completely stationary and locked in placed! Lower slowly for 2 seconds, hold at the bottom for 1 second, and then squeeze your triceps hard at the top of the movement. 


thanks for reading.


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