here you will find a lot of amazing bodybuilding and fitness which will help you to get a great and healthy body.

ADS

Saturday, September 14, 2019

7 Major Mistakes Limiting Your Calf Size - bodybuilding110

Every trainee I know covets a set of nicely developed calves. If you’re like me, and many other bodybuilders, you’re in constant pursuit of turning your calves into full-blown cows! There are very few muscle groups that I (and many others) have found to be as stubborn to grow as calves. Indeed, the lack of progress in calf development has discouraged many trainees to the point where they reluctantly give up in their pursuit of bigger calves.



Even if you consider yourself to be the owner the world’s worst calf genetics, you can make more progress if you will just avoid making these common calf-training mistakes, as listed below! By avoiding these common mistakes, you can break past any temporary training plateaus you might have, to get you on the road to those developed calves you’ve always wanted.

Here’s the list of 7 common calf training mistakes:

1 Training calves at the end of your workout:

Calves are often neglected or saved for the last part of a leg workout, this is when you’re tired and lack energy. Muscles can’t grow if they receive sub-par training, you must start training them the way you train your back or chest: fresh, from every angle, and to complete exhaustion.

Start your leg training with calves, train them with the same intensity as you do your quads and hamstrings. If you’re trying to hit your upper legs hard and don’t have the energy to do the same with calves, add an extra calf day into your split or add the work to a different workout. The point is to ensure that your calves don’t suffer from lack of attention.

2 Training Calves Once a Week:

Training calves once a week is one of the biggest mistakes you can make. Even if you only want to keep one major leg day a week (quads, hamstring, calves), try adding calves onto other workouts throughout the week so your training calves 2-3 times a week and sticking to the 10-15 Rep Range.

While this rep range might be effective for most other parts of your body, calves are a bit different. You need to look at doing 20+ reps preferably closer to 30.  This forces you to use a lighter weight which means better form.

This leads to a better contraction of the calves muscles and a better pump following those 30 reps. It also allows you to overload a muscle that is used to high rep work (remember your calves get a lot of work naturally throughout the day just from walking around.

3 Using Too Heavy Weights:

While lifting heavy is important to building muscle, if the weights are so big that you can’t use proper form then you won’t see much benefit. Symptoms of using too much weight include bouncing the weight at the bottom of reps, or not contracting at the top of reps.

Worse you might end up bringing other leg muscles into the exercise to help move the weight. In addition to reducing your gains training this way will also set you up for possible injury. If you feel pain in your Achilles tendon then you are definitely lifting too much weight.

Similarly, if you are unable to perform standing calf raises without bending your knees, or seated calf raises without using your arms to help the weight up then you need to adjust the resistance downwards.

4 Only Training With Small Weights:

To look on the opposite point of view, you cannot expect results only training with light weight and high reps. Calves are one of the high resistance muscle groups that require overload once in a while to grow. Try something between the two: heavy weight/low reps and low weight/high reps and see which gives you the best results. Most will find a combination of the two gives optimal calve growth.

5 Foot placement:

A lot of people think that you can hit different parts of the calves depending on whether you point your feet inward, straight ahead or outwards. People who turn their feet at extreme angles are actually reducing the effectiveness of the exercise and also putting a lot of stress on the joints and tissues in the knees and ankles.

6 Not isolate and contract the muscles:

In order to get the full benefit of the calf raise you need to emphasis the contraction at the top of the exercise. Focus on flexing hard at the top of each rep and it will make all the difference in your workout.

Once you’ve contracted properly at the top of the rep it doesn’t mean you can drop the weight down to the beginning. Lower the weight slowly and under control and do this for each rep.

Each part of the rep should be under control. Taking your time throughout each rep will increase the amount of time your calves are under tension, even when using the same weights and reps you normally do.


7 Skipping stretching:

You might feel pain, but there is another reason to stretch; it stretches out the fascia, a thin connective tissue “cocoon” around each muscle, which can get very tight and compress the muscle. This creates a compacting effect on the muscle so it cannot expand and grow as effectively.

You also need to fully stretch your calves between sets and immediately after training them. This increases mobility, enlarges the fascia and boosts the pump, which in turn aids recovery and growth.


Share:

0 comments:

Post a Comment

Sample Text


Copyright © www.bodybuilding110.com | Powered by Blogger Design by ronangelo | Blogger Theme by NewBloggerThemes.com