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Showing posts with label Training schedule. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Training schedule. Show all posts

Friday, March 27, 2020

A 20-Minute Indoor Cardio Workout At Home

A 20 Minute Indoor Cardio Workout For Losing Fat And Shaping Up is part of Workout - This workout is perfect and makes way more sense to get in a cardio workout indoors to shift fat and shape your body! Here is a 20minute cardio workout to do at home without any equipment The workout below is all about “burst training,” which is highintensity interval training  Burst training is traditionally a twotoone ratio, 20 seconds on …

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We hope will give you some good ideas for your project, You can see another items of this gallery. Build Muscle Or Lose Fat First to Maximise Muscle Gains, Get a certified personal trainer.

    Stationary sprinters — 20 seconds
    Boxer stance — 10 seconds
    Squat thrust — 20 seconds
    Boxer stance — 10 seconds
    Spider-Man mountain climber — 20 seconds
    Boxer stance — 10 seconds
    Criss-cross pickup — 20 seconds
    Boxer stance — 10 seconds
    Power plank — 20 seconds
    Boxer stance — 10 seconds

Repeat the above circuit eight times to make this workout 20 minutes. If you have only have 15 minutes, do it six times through. And don’t forget to properly warm up before and cool down after!

Here’s how to do the moves:


1. Stationary Sprinter — 20 seconds

Sprinting is a really simple way to increase your heart rate. Sprinting in the heat is dangerous, so the next closest exercise is sprinting in place. It’s important to engage your entire body.

Stationary Sprinter — 20 seconds

Sprinting is a really simple way to increase your heart rate. "Sprinting in the heat is dangerous, so the next closest exercise is sprinting in place," Kline says. "It’s important to engage your entire body. Clench your hands, pump your arms hard enough to rotate your shoulders, engage your core, and drive your knees above your belly button while staying light on the balls of your feet." Do this as fast as you can (the model is doing it slowly for demonstration purposes) for 20 seconds.

2 Boxer Stance — 10 seconds

This is your active rest. Between each move, recover for 10 seconds by doing boxer stance. Stand on the balls of your feet with your dominant foot a foot or so behind your nondominant foot, body angled to your dominant side. Hold your fists up by your face. Lightly hop back and forth from one foot to the other, keeping your knees soft, chest lifted, core tight, and arms up. Do this for 10 seconds (or more if you need a longer break in between the other moves).

3 Squat Thrust — 20 seconds

Kline calls this "the mother of all burst training moves." Think about exploding up when your feet hit the floor and you start to stand up—it's "key to elevating your heart rate," Kline says. To avoid injuring your hands, make sure to perform this movement with the palms of your hands flat on the ground instead of just your fingertips, he adds.

    - Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, arms by your sides.
    - Bend your knees and reach forward to place your hands on the floor.
    - Kick your legs back into a plank.
    - Immediately jump your legs forward back to start and stand back up.
    - Continue for 20 seconds.

4 Spider-Man Mountain Climber — 20 seconds

"With restricted space, it’s important to find ways to engage your core like a brisk 20-minute run would," Kline says. This movement is a good option that works your whole core but concentrates on your obliques.

    - Start in a high plank.
    - Drive your right knee out and up toward your right tricep. As you do, turn your head to watch your knee meet your arm. "I often train clients be able to 'see' their knees with both eyes for maximum range of motion," Kline says.
    - Alternate sides as fast as you can while still maintaining a sturdy plank and keeping your torso in place.
    - Continue for 20 seconds.

5 Criss-Cross Pickup — 20 seconds

This move gets your heart pumping and fires up your glutes and quads.

   - Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent.
   - Lower into a squat and reach your fingertips toward the ground, keeping your chest lifted.
   - Jump up and cross your right foot over your left foot, and then jump back to start.
   - Repeat with the opposite foot in front. Continue this movement, alternating, for 20 seconds.

6 Power Plank — 20 seconds

This moving plank variation requires your arms, core, and legs to all engage. Plus, jumping and having to rebalance yourself each time increases how hard your entire body has to work.

    - Start in a high plank.
    - Jump your feet up to the outside of your hands. "You want to aim your big toes to touch your pinky fingers," Kline says.
    - Make sure to keep your core tight. As much as you can, try to avoid arching your back as you move.
    - Repeat for 20 seconds.
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Monday, March 23, 2020

The Upper-Body Dumbbell Workout You Can Do At Home

This dumbbell workout is a go-to full-body workout for any fitness level. You can do it at home or in the gym. It involves all major muscle groups and movement patterns (squatting, pushing, pulling…).

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bent-over row

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How Hold a dumbbell in each hand with palms facing each other. Bend forward, hingeing at the hips, then row the weights up to your sides, leading with your elbows. Lower the weights back to the start under control.

Why This move hits the major muscles of your upper back, while your lower back gets worked to keep your torso upright. Using a hammer grip also hits your forearms and improves grip strength.


Flat Bench

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 This multijoint chest exercise is a proven mass-builder. Although you’ll quickly discover if one side of your pecs is stronger than the other, you get a longer range of motion over the barbell version because you can press both up and in rather than just up

Do it Right: Lie faceup on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand just outside your shoulders. Powerfully press the weights up and together, stopping when they’re an inch or so away from touching. Slowly return to the start

Power Pointer: Don’t let the dumbbells touch at the top, because you’ll release tension on the pecs and start getting into the habit of resting briefly at the top of each rep. Leave a few inches between the weights so your pecs don’t get a chance to relax

Spider curl


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How Bend down and rest your elbows on your thighs, holding a dumbbell in each hand with arms straight. Curl the weights up, squeeze your biceps at the top, then lower back to the start under control.

Why It may raise a few eyebrows in the gym, but this exercise works your biceps through a full range of motion so you hit them from a slightly different angle, meaning even more muscle fibres are recruited.

Seated Overhead Dumbbell Press


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Because you don’t have a bar in your hands, you can draw your elbows all the way back outside your ears. That places more emphasis on the middle delts, the one delt head that makes you appear wider. In contrast, with a barbell your elbows have to travel forward so the bar clears your face, calling upon more front delts than middle delts

Do it Right: Adjust the bench so your back is fully supported and upright, and grasp a dumbbell in each hand above shoulder level with a pronated grip (palms facing forward). Strongly press the weights overhead in an arc, but don’t let them touch at the top. Lower under control back to the start

Power Pointer: Don’t stop the downward motion when your arms form 90-degree angles; instead, bring the dumbbells all the way down until your elbows point toward the floor and the weights are just above shoulder level. It’s safe for your shoulders, and you recruit more muscle fibers when using this greater range of motion

Dumbbell Shrug


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The range of motion here is only a few inches. The up-and-down movement should be fluid and controlled, not explosive. Because you’re using dumbbells, the neutral (palms-in) grip helps keep your arms and shoulders in the most comfortable and safest position possible.

Do it Right: Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand at your sides with your palms facing in. Keeping your chest up and abs tight, shrug your shoulders straight up toward the ceiling, squeezing your traps at the top. Slowly reverse the motion, letting the weights lower your shoulders as far as possible.

Power Pointer: Avoid rolling your shoulders — it doesn’t engage the upper traps more successfully and can actually cause severe strain of the delicate rotator-cuff muscles. Keep the motion strictly up and down.

Crunch


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How Lie flat on the floor, holding a dumbbell across your chest. Engage your abs, then raise your torso off the floor. Squeeze your abs at the top, then lower yourself slowly and under control.

Why The crunch is great for developing your upper abs, but only if you do it right. And the added resistance of the dumbbell will force those muscles to up their game to lift and lower your torso without help from momentum.

Triceps extension


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How Stand tall, holding a dumbbell over your head with one hand and arm straight. Keeping your chest up, lower the weight behind your head, then raise it back to the start. Do all the reps with one arm and then switch and repeat.

Why Working one arm at a time allows you to focus on making your triceps work hard to keep the dumbbell under complete control throughout the lift and lower, while your core must be engaged to keep your torso upright.


Squat

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How Stand tall holding a dumbbell in each hand. Keeping your chest up and core braced, squat down as deep as you can. Push back up through your heels to return to the start position.

Why It’s the classic lift for building bigger and stronger legs and because it’s a big compound lift that recruits multiple muscle groups, it’s also effective at torching belly fat too.

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Wednesday, September 4, 2019

The Best Complete Upper-Body Dumbbell Workout

Tone muscles in your chest and the back of your shoulders and arms with these easy upper-body exercises.



Upper-Body Dumbbell Workout

One-Arm Dumbbell Row (Lower lats) 4 Sets x 6, 6, 10, 10 Reps

Flat-Bench Dumbbell Press (Pecs) 4 Sets x 6, 6, 10, 10 Reps

Seated Overhead Dumbbell Press (All three delt heads) 4 Sets x 8, 8, 12, 12 Reps

Dumbbell Shrug (Upper traps) 3 Sets x 8, 8, 8 Reps

Seated One-Arm Overhead Dumbbell Extension (Triceps long head) 2 Sets x 10, 10 Reps


 Alternating Dumbbell Curl (Both biceps heads) 2 Sets x 10, 10 Reps

Dumbbell Wrist Curl (Brachioradialis) 2 Sets x 12, 12 Reps

* Doesn’t include warm-up sets; do as many as you need but never take warm-up sets to muscle failure.

* Select a weight that causes you to fail in the designated rep range.



One-Arm Dumbbell Row






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Training one arm at a time with this move proves unparalleled for growth. Because you can use a little body english, you can actually recruit more muscle fibers and generate more force than when using both arms simultaneously in the barbell bent-over version.

Do it Right: Lean forward at the waist, and place one knee and the same-side hand on a flat bench. Keep your other foot on the floor beside the bench and grasp a dumbbell in the same-side hand, allowing the weight to hang straight down with your arm fully extended. Pull the weight toward your hip, keeping your elbow in close. Pull your elbow as far back as you can, squeezing your shoulder blades together for a full contraction, then lower the dumbbell along the same path. Repeat for reps, then switch arms.

Power Pointer: A common mistake is to bring the dumbbell straight up to the shoulder. However, the best line of pull is up and back toward your hip. That provides a greater range of motion and time under tension for the stubborn lower lats.


Flat-Bench Dumbbell Press






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This multijoint chest exercise is a proven mass-builder. Although you’ll quickly discover if one side of your pecs is stronger than the other, you get a longer range of motion over the barbell version because you can press both up and in rather than just up.

Do it Right: Lie faceup on the bench with your feet flat on the floor. Grasp a dumbbell in each hand just outside your shoulders. Powerfully press the weights up and together, stopping when they’re an inch or so away from touching. Slowly return to the start.

Power Pointer: Don’t let the dumbbells touch at the top, because you’ll release tension on the pecs and start getting into the habit of resting briefly at the top of each rep. Leave a few inches between the weights so your pecs don’t get a chance to relax.


Seated Overhead Dumbbell Press






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Because you don’t have a bar in your hands, you can draw your elbows all the way back outside your ears. That places more emphasis on the middle delts, the one delt head that makes you appear wider. In contrast, with a barbell your elbows have to travel forward so the bar clears your face, calling upon more front delts than middle delts.
Do it Right: Adjust the bench so your back is fully supported and upright, and grasp a dumbbell in each hand above shoulder level with a pronated grip (palms facing forward). Strongly press the weights overhead in an arc, but don’t let them touch at the top. Lower under control back to the start.
Power Pointer: Don’t stop the downward motion when your arms form 90-degree angles; instead, bring the dumbbells all the way down until your elbows point toward the floor and the weights are just above shoulder level. It’s safe for your shoulders, and you recruit more muscle fibers when using this greater range of motion.

Dumbbell Shrug






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The range of motion here is only a few inches. The up-and-down movement should be fluid and controlled, not explosive. Because you’re using dumbbells, the neutral (palms-in) grip helps keep your arms and shoulders in the most comfortable and safest position possible.
Do it Right: Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand at your sides with your palms facing in. Keeping your chest up and abs tight, shrug your shoulders straight up toward the ceiling, squeezing your traps at the top. Slowly reverse the motion, letting the weights lower your shoulders as far as possible.
Power Pointer: Avoid rolling your shoulders — it doesn’t engage the upper traps more successfully and can actually cause severe strain of the delicate rotator-cuff muscles. Keep the motion strictly up and down.

Seated One-Arm Overhead Dumbbell Extension






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With your arm overhead, you’ll better engage the largest and most dominant muscle on the back of the arm, the meaty long head of the triceps. That’s true no matter what kind of equipment you use — cable, barbell or dumbbell.
Do it Right: Sit erect on an upright bench, feet flat on the floor. Grasp a dumbbell and hold it overhead at full arm extension. Bending only your elbow, lower the weight behind your head until your arm forms a 90-degree angle. Feel your triceps stretch, then press back up to full-arm extension and squeeze your tri’s hard at the top. Repeat for reps, then switch arms.
Power Pointer: Try the two-arm version, too, but keep your elbows in tight. Allowing them to flare out wide reduces the muscular stress on the triceps.

Alternating Dumbbell Curl






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Unlike the barbell curl, the alternating dumbbell curl allows you to perform what’s called supination at the top of each rep. Starting with a palms-in (neutral) grip, you can slowly turn your wrists as you approach the top of the move, and that twisting motion allows for a better peak contraction and overall growth.

Do it Right: Stand erect holding a dumbbell in each hand at your sides. Keeping your chest up and elbows in tight, curl one weight toward the same-side shoulder, turning your wrist up as you go. Squeeze your biceps hard at the top, then lower to the start. Repeat with the opposite arm.

Power Pointer: Of all the ways to perform this movement wrong, the most common is to try to bring the weight as high as possible, which pulls your elbow away from your side. However, this recruits the front delts and lessens the isolation on the biceps. Keep those elbows back!


Dumbbell Wrist Curl






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The wrist curl goes last, and that’s no accident. If you hit your forearms too early in your workout, they’ll fatigue and prevent you from maintaining a good grip when training larger muscles like the back and biceps. This puts those bodyparts at a disadvantage because they rely on the forearms to be fresh.

Do it Right: Sit at the end of a bench with your forearms flat on it, and grasp a dumbbell in each hand with your palms up. Allow the weights to roll to your fingers, then use your wrists to curl the dumbbells back to the start.
Power Pointer: For a greater range of motion and stretch on the brachioradialis, keep your thumb on the same side of the dumbbell handle as your fingers. This ensures that you fully engage as much of the lower forearm as possible.

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Tuesday, July 16, 2019

Best Five Days Full Body Workout Program

When performing each exercise and move up a set, you will do more weight and less repetitions to build both size and strength. Adding more weight will help build the muscles and make them fuller.

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Monday :


- This day focuses on targeting the chest and back muscles through the use of push and pulling mechanics.

Tuesday :

- On Tuesday you will work the leg and abs through compound movements to build larger size and fuller muscles.

Wednesday :

- Arms days are important on building size and strength through explosive moments and heavy weight.

Thursday :


- Rest day to prepare for weekend of heavy shoulders/back/chest/arms

Friday :

- It is important to target and focus upon the back and shoulder muscles twice a week as the back is a crucial body part to give you that fuller and bulk look.

Saturday :

- Saturdays are used to re-target the chest and legs through compound movements along with adding in workouts that help boost strength, endurance and stamina.

Sunday :


- Rest

This routine is split between 5 days and performed for 5 weeks, each week testing the limits to how much you are able to push yourself to reach new 1RM's. The main focus is upon bulking and lifting heavier weight for 3 to 4 sets while performing less repetitions with each set.

You can also set this routine to either a Day of the Week type of routine or Numerical Day based.


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Thursday, June 27, 2019

Ways to Shoulder Press

The overhead press is to shoulder training what the squat is to leg day: the foundational movement from which all other exercises for its respective muscle group stem. When it’s time to train delts and decide on your workout for the day, the first question should be: What type of overhead press am I going to do?



Believe it or not, there are many more ways to answer this question than just “barbell” or “dumbbells.” Those pieces of equipment are in the discussion, of course, but so are machines and kettlebells; bilateral versus unilateral; pronated, supinated, or neutral grip; and seated, standing, or even kneeling. The overhead press (aka “shoulder press”) is a movement with way more variants than most guys utilize. Below are six such options, all of which should be fair game the next time you train delts.



1. Seated Dumbbell Press

When you sit during your dumbbell press, you can lift more weight because you can use your back to push against the seat. This means you can grow your muscles faster since you can create more micro-tears in your muscle fiber with the heavier weight.


To perform this exercise, sit on a seat with a low back or an upright bench with two dumbbells. Lift them just outside your shoulders with your palms facing forward. You will need to contract your deltoids and extend your elbows straight upwards until both of the dumbbells are raised over your head with your arms almost locking out. Lower the dumbbells to their primary position slowly and congratulations, you’ve just completed a rep. Do the seated dumbbell press as your first exercise, if you’re not doing the military press. If you are, save the seated dumbbell press for another day or do them right after the military press, which brings us to…

2. Military Press

Military presses are thought to be the fourth big lift, along with bench press, squat and deadlift exercises, but if you really want to test your mettle, the classic standing barbell press will do the job. Your upper-body pushing strength is put to the test, but it’s way more than just a triceps and deltoid movement. You will also need a lot of core stabilization to do military presses, as well as a tough midsection as a foundation from where the pressing begins.


To perform the military press, hold a barbell with an overhand, shoulder-width grip while standing. Lift the bar up to your shoulders while bending your knees a bit, and then tense up your whole body. While making sure that your lower body and torso are solid, press the bar over your head and contract your deltoids while extending your arms. You don’t need to lock out, so stop right before you do. Lower the bar down and remember to not let it rest on your chest or shoulders between reps. Do this exercise first in your shoulder workout and make sure to not have any other big lifts on the same day.


3. Machine Press

Everyone who’s anyone in the bodybuilding world recommends machine presses for one of two reasons – first, it’s safe because the motion is controlled by the machine, which means little to no risk of injury when compared to using dumbbells or barbells, and second, you can overload your target muscles because the machine eliminates the need for some of your stabilizing muscles because it is a stabilizing agent itself. It’s a far safer and a bit more effective deltoid exercise, so of course it should be on this list.

Do this exercise on an overhead press machine. Start by adjusting your seat so that you’re able to extend your arms through the entire range of motion, but you should also be able to put the handles down to your shoulders without the weight being on the stack. Sit and hold the handles with your hands just outside your shoulder width, with your palms facing forward. Squeeze your deltoids to press your handles straight up until your arms are fully extended, but not locked out. Put the weight back in the starting position to do another rep. Do this exercise early in your training instead of barbell or overhead dumbbell presses.

4. Smith Machine Press

When you do the Smith machine press, you will benefit from the extra safety and overload benefits as the machine press, except you will be doing some barbell presses since you’ll be grabbing a bar instead of some rubber handles. You can’t make a clear difference in efficacy between the Smith machine, Hammer Strength overhead presses or a selectorized machine since they have pretty much the same effect. Instead, you can switch up the varieties in your training routine and pick a favorite that gives you a better feeling.


Do this exercise by sitting on an upright bench or a seat with a back to it, in the middle of the Smith machine in a position where if you lower the bar, it will almost touch your head. Sit and take the bar with a grip wider than your shoulders with your palms facing forward. Unhook the latches and lower it down just below your chin. Press the bar up and over your head, but don’t lock out your elbows when you get to the top of the movement. Lower the bar and repeat. Place this exercise early in your training regimen instead of dumbbells, machines or a barbell overhead press.

5. Arnold Press

The Arnold press is named after Schwarzenegger himself. Have your wrists out so that when you get to the top of the movement, you will only be adding a frontal deltoid effect to a seated overhead press. This exercise will also affect your upper chest region. You can do it while sitting or standing, but if you sit your back will be protected and you’ll be able to lift more.


To perform this exercise, sit on a seat or a bench with a pair of dumbbells. Hold them in front of your shoulders with a supinated grip, which means your palms should be facing you. Press the weights upwards and turn your wrists outwards, so at the height of the movement, your palms face away from you and towards your front. Lower your dumbbells while rotating your wrists back into a supinated grip. Do this exercise early in the workout instead of lower back or barbell exercises or even normal overhead dumbbell presses. You can also do it after any of these, your choice.


6. One-Arm Press

The point to this exercise is for it to be unilateral, which will let you balance both your strength and your progress in both of your sides. It’s really tricky to make both sides equal, so this exercise helps. If both sides are lifting at the same time even with dumbbells and kettlebells, the stronger side makes up what the weaker side lacks. When you press with one side only, you can see the strength imbalance and you can work on fixing it by doing unilateral exercises.


To perform this exercise, take a kettlebell or a dumbbell in one hand right in front of your shoulder. Have your elbow bent and the weight should be lying on the outside part of your forearm. Stabilize your core and slightly bend your knees. Press up with all your might straight upwards and turn your wrist forward. This means that the kettlebell should be behind your forearm when you get to the top of the movement. Bring your weight back down slowly and perform all the following reps with that arm. Switch arms and go again. Do this exercise early in the routine, instead of a barbell overhead press, an Arnold press or a two-arm dumbbell overhead press.



Finally, here is an outline of what these exercises should look in your training regimen.

  • 3-4 sets of machine presses with 8 reps each. Remember to switch between Smith machine overhead presses, military presses or seated dumbbell overhead presses.
  • 2-3 sets of Arnold press. Switch between one-arm dumbbell or kettlebell presses.
  • 3 sets of upright rows with 12 reps each.
  • 3 sets of dumbbell or cable lateral raises with 12 reps each. You can superset this exercise with some reverse pec deck for your rear delts. Do 3 sets with 15 reps each for this exercise.
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Wednesday, May 22, 2019

The Push/Pull/Legs Routine for Best Muscle Gains

Mass-Building Basics

Push, pull and legs is a very simple, yet effective training split for anyone, ranging from those picking up their first barbell to hardened gym veterans. Push workouts include chest, shoulders and triceps. Pull workouts take care of back and biceps. While leg workouts cover quads, hamstrings and calves.




The reason it works so well is that it places more emphasis on multi-joint compound exercises than on isolation-based exercises. Don’t expect set after set of pec deck and preacher curls in this program. The main reason for the majority of these workouts being comprised of compound exercises is exercises like barbell bench press, squats and deadlifts offer the most ‘bang for your buck’. They involve multiple muscle groups and allow the most room for progression of reps and weight. This means more growth for you.

Putting It All Together

The basic premise of any push, pull and legs programme will always be similar, but there will be subtle differences for those just getting started in the gym to those who have been slinging iron for years.

The first major difference between the beginner program and the advanced program is the addition of training days. The advanced trainer will be training two days on and one day off, which allows for increased frequency of hitting body parts, leading to more opportunities for growth and recovery.

 A Sample Push/Pull/Legs Split Routine

Here’s a great sample workout plan that is well structured and properly balanced; and it’s sure to give you exceptional results…

Workout 1 – Push

Bench Press 3 X 5 – 7
Seated Dumbbell Shoulder Press 3 X 6 – 8
Incline Dumbbell Press 3 X 8 – 10
Side Lateral Raises 2 X 10 – 12
Triceps Pressdowns 2 X 8 – 10
Overhead Triceps Extension 2 X 8 – 10

 Workout 2 – Pull

Bent-over Row 3 X 5 – 7
Pull Ups 3 X 6 – 8
Barbell Shrugs 3 X 8 – 10
Face Pulls 2 X 10 – 12
Barbell Curl 2 X 8 – 10
Dumbbell Hammer Curl 2 X 8 – 10

Workout 3 – Legs/Abs

 Squats 3 X 6 – 8
Romanian Deadlifts 2 X 8 – 10
Leg Press 2 X 10 – 12
Leg Curl 2 X 10 – 12
Calf Raise 4 X 8 – 10
Hanging Leg Raise 2 X 10 – 15

The sets listed are your work sets. Always warm up properly first in order to prepare your body for the heavier work, and to help prevent injury. However another advantage of this split routine is that fewer warm-up sets are required as training each exercise/body part warms you up for the next.
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Monday, May 13, 2019

Doing Cardio While Building Muscle

If you asked me a few years ago what I thought about doing cardio when muscle building, I’d have quoted the following:

‘Never run when you can walk. Never walk when you can stand. Never stand when you can sit. Never sit when you can lay down. Never lay down when you can sleep’.




While I still agree with this to an extent, the quote is better off reserved to only those who can effortlessly stay lean year round and struggle to gain any weight.

So without further adieu, here’s the real deal on doing cardio while trying to gain size and strength…

If you are a beginner who also happens to be a ripped ectomorph who has to fight for every ounce he gains (e.g. a classic hardgainer), I suggest that you lay off cardio almost entirely for at least 8-12 weeks.

Get your training and diet down and pack on some size.


In that time you should be able to gain at least 15lbs of muscle if not 20+.

After you have done that you can add in some cardio.

I would start with three weekly sessions of twenty minutes of moderate intensity cardio; no intervals.

Use a bike to limit the amount of eccentric stress or pounding on the joints.

And remember there are actually things known as real bikes that go outside, not just stationary bikes that people park themselves on to watch Oprah.

Although, if you choose that route, get one with a well padded seat that will not lead to the death of your sex life.

If you are beyond the beginner level you should always be doing some kind of cardio on a regular basis, be it intervals, moderate intensity steady state, or low intensity, long duration steady state.

Again, don’t limit yourself to machines indoors; get outside and drag a sled, run sprints, jump rope or play a sport.

That’s a lot more fun anyway.

I think everyone should be doing something like this at least three days per week for at least 30 minutes.

It’s healthy and prevents a host of health problems, not to mention that it keeps you in shape and looking good.

Contrary to what many people believe, cardio can actually be of great benefit to those looking to get bigger and stronger.

Not only does it improve the cardiovascular system and thus improve the quality of your weight training workouts but it allows you to eat more muscle building calories while staying lean.

To pack on 20-30 pounds of muscle you have to eat an inordinate amount of food.

Doing some cardio will help ensure that you don’t get fat from all the excessive eating.

The bottom line is that everyone but absolute beginners should be doing some kind of cardio type activity at least three times per week for thirty minutes.

This will not inhibit size or strength gains in the least but may actually enhance them.

You should vary your activities and intensities as much as possible.

You can do cardio immediately after you train, although I prefer to do it on non weight training days or later in the day after training because I am usually too spent after lifting to give it my all on the cardio.

Doing it on off days is usually a better option anyway because it serves as an active recovery activity and also gets you burning some calories on those days.
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Wednesday, April 17, 2019

Build Muscle Strength Fast

Strength has long been a point of comparison with others and a way of rating our physical prowess in the gym.

Remember: new exercise should always be undertaken with professional help, and you should consult a doctor before starting if you have any pre-existing medical issues.






With the advent of Sports Science and the continued research that is being done we now know more about how to gain muscle strength fast than we have ever done in the past. Ironically there is very little that has changed except the most important discovery, which was the proof that high intensity will get faster results than normal training.

We know that training for strength is the fastest way to build muscle or lose fat as well any other physical permanence like running faster or hitting harder. If strength is your primary objective then you need to start with the basics which are the big four compound movements that have proven themselves to work.

The ‘big four’ are the squats, deadlift, bench-press and shoulder press movements that we need to do at least twice a week. Training with a split routine is a good idea as it allows you to focus on specific body-parts and give the body-parts that you have trained sufficient time to rest and recover.

The bodybuilding community has a catch phrase which says “the barbell is king in any weight-room and the dumbbell is queen.” This means that you should forget about doing any fancy machine work if your objective is strength as you want to only use free weights.

You should NEVER train more than 45 minutes with high intensity and always concentrate on keeping you workouts short so that you can take full advantage of the hormone surges that this high intensity producers. This means only one main lift for every workout which means four lifts when you train the Big Four.

After first doing the main lift you should then do one or even two assistant lift to further strengthen the muscles that do most of the lifting for the main lift. It is a good idea to always rotate different rep ranges when you train for strength however the best for the fastest strength gains will come from doing sets with 5 reps.

Avoiding the dreaded plateau where you cannot lift a heavier weight anymore is something that you want to keep an eye on every time you train. This means making sure that you never go too heavy too early or for too long. Leave your ego at home when you are training and ONLY lift a maximum of 10% more weight in each workout.

You have to do cardio if you want to continue to get strong but ironically science has proven that doing too much cardio like running or cycling for hours at a time producers hormones that can actually break down muscle tissue. This means that you need to do hard bursts of cardio with a quick rest.

There are many variations of this but the best would be to select a steep hill that you can sprint up and then walk slowly down. When starting this type of training you should do less than you think you can do and rather increase by doing one more sprint the next time you do this.
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Saturday, March 23, 2019

German Volume Training

Pauses between repetitions make it possible to take heavier loads and thus to recruit fibers with a high activation threshold. Eccentric training is excellent for overcoming strong trays. What is important to remember is that (provided you put intensity!) Everything works, at least, during the first weeks necessary for adaptation. But the German Volume Training is in a class of its own.



The origins of German Volume Training

Nevertheless, there is a training system that places a notch above the rest; brutal and difficult, but very effective to gain inches quickly. In the middle of the force this method is called the 10 x 10 method. I prefer to call it German Volume Training (GVT) because it was born in the days of both Germanys. As far as I know this method was popularized in Germany in the mid 70's by Rolf Feser who was at the time the national coach of the weightlifting team. In the United States, Vince Gironda promoted a similar approach. But whoever is at the origin, it is above all a method that has proven itself!

In Germany the 10 series method was used during the general physical preparation phase of weightlifting teams to gain lean mass. This method was so effective that in 12 weeks athletes often climbed to the top weight category. It was the basic program of Jacques Demers, a Canadian weightlifter, silver medalist at the Los Angeles Olympics. Jacques was known in the middle for his huge thighs and he attributes this spectacular level of hypertrophy to German Volume Training. This is the same method that Bev Francis followed to gain weight during his early years of bodybuilding.

It should also be included with a good nutritional support in order to provide all the required raw materials in order to get the maximum use out of any rest that was achieved during the program. Having the correct balance of protein, carbs and good fats is essential to get good results.

The routine listed below is something that should be trained four times a week with a day break between any of the days where you might need a break. It can also be done daily for 4 days followed by 3 days of rest. The adding of weight will again depend on the time rested between sets.




Day One: Chest & Back:
Exercise  Sets  Reps  Tempo  Rest Intervals
A1. Bench Press         5  5         201          0
A2. DB Flyes  5  5  602          60 seconds
B1. Incline Bench Press 5   5               201  0
B2. Incline DB Flyes 5  5               602          60 seconds
C1. Cable Lats Pulldown 5  5               201  0
C2. DB Rows  5  5  602          60 seconds
D1. Barbell Rows 5  5         201          0
D2. Pullovers         5  5  602          60 seconds

Day Two: Legs:
Exercise  Sets  Reps  Tempo  Rest Intervals
A1. Squats  5  5  201          0
A2. Lunges  5  5  602  60 seconds
B1. Leg Extensions  5  5  201          0
B2. Leg Curl  5  5  602         60 seconds
C1. Stiff-Leg Deadlift  5         5               201  0
C2. Hamstring Curls 5               5  602  60 seconds

Day Three: Arms:
Exercise  Sets  Reps  Tempo  Rest Intervals
A1. Barbell Curl 5         5         201          0
A2. DB Curl  5  5  602          60 seconds
B1. Preacher Curl 5  5  201          0
B2. Reverse Curl 5  5  602          60 seconds
C1. Cable Tri Pushdown 5  5               201  0
C2. Skull crushers  5  5  602          60 seconds
D1. Close Grip Bench    5           5  201          0
D2. Overhead Extensions 5               5  602          60 seconds

Day Four: Shoulders & Abs:
Exercise        Sets  Reps  Tempo  Rest Intervals
A1. DB Press        5  5  201        0
A2. Side Lateral Raise 5         5              602  60 seconds
B1. Military Press     5  5         201          0
B2. Bent Over Laterals 5  5         602  60 seconds
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Tuesday, March 12, 2019

A Simple Workout Routine to Get Big Fast

But with all of the traffic out there regarding specific plans, protocols, and formulas, it’s easy to bang your head against the wall and fall into the black hole of frustration and confusion. Drowning in information makes the temptation to throw in the towel even stronger. Another trap is to become a plan jumper. Are you constantly switching from plan to plan without any real commitment to one for a significant period of time? Do you lack any real results from the last six months of training? How about the last year? 



You might need to start over.

If what you are doing now is working, then by all means don’t stop. But if you’re the type I talked about above, then an intervention may be in order. You may feel comfortable in what you’re doing; you may be strong in certain areas and like that feeling; or you may just be a creature of habit and fear change. Whichever category you fit into, you have to ask yourself a serious question: Is what I’m doing getting me closer to my ultimate goal?

 The best workout routine to get big fast should include the following compound movements:

Chest: Bench press (any variation), Dips, Pushups


Back: Deadlift, Lat Pulldown, Bent Over Row, Chin Ups


Legs: Squats, Deadlifts, Lunges


Arms: Dips, Pushups, Chin Ups


Shoulders: Military Press (barbell & dumbbell), Arnold Press





So if building mass and size are your goals be sure to incorporate these exercises into your routine complemented with isolation movements, a sound diet and cardiovascular exercises.
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Sunday, March 3, 2019

The Must Do Exercises for Beginning Bodybuilders

Bodybuilding is a test of strength and endurance which requires a lot of concentration and resolve to achieve the desired goal. Besides these, the road to bodybuilding also depends on planning a proper workout, diet and above all, following correct exercise schedule. It is important for the bodybuilders, especially beginners, to execute the correct form of an exercise beginning with slow and light workouts and gradually increasing the pace thereafter. The newbies also need to understand the possible effects of certain exercises on different body parts.



If you are a beginner, take plenty of time to rest in between your exercise sessions to avoid over-training. Read further to know more about the perfect bodybuilding exercise for you.

This article is for true beginners, defined as someone that has no base built yet (meaning you have less than 3-6 months, depending on age, of continuous lifting). With that in mind here are the absolute MUST DO exercises for you:

Military Press. This exercise works the shoulders and triceps.

Bench Press. This exercise works the chest, triceps and some shoulder.

Seated Row. This exercise works all the back muscles, biceps and some trapezius.

Lat Pull Down. This exercise works the large muscles of the back and biceps.

Squat. This works every muscle you have below the waist.

Notice that each of these exercises is a compound move, meaning it works more than one muscle at a time. Beginners should never spend time on isolation exercises, including bicep curls. By definition isolation moves are an advanced exercise and until you have a foundation built you are wasting valuable energy as well as time doing them. Beginners need to get bang for the lift.
When do you stop being a beginner? Obviously it varies according to age but the rule of thumb I use for people is when you can do all 5 of these exercises in a single workout, 3 times a week and not experience the "beginner's soreness" anymore. If you are a seasoned lifter you get muscle soreness differently than beginning lifters. Until you have a foundation the soreness you feel is one that is actually restrictive of your range of motion and you don't "feel" stronger workout to workout. Veteran lifters get sore but it's a "good "sore. You'll know the difference. Only then should you start adding to these 5 foundation building moves.
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Friday, February 22, 2019

A Full Body Workout You Can Do At Home

Not everyone can afford 30+ minutes to work out or hit the gym 3-5 times per week…

Are you short on time but want to increase your fitness level?

Or do you just find it difficult to create a workout habit due to a busy schedule?

A 10-minute full-body workout is a good way to do something good for yourself and experience health benefits at the same time.




Benefits of the 10-Minute Ultimate Workout:

    Improves cardiorespiratory fitness
    Activates all major muscle groups
    Elevates your heart rate and helps burn more calories
    Boosts brain function 


1. Burpees – 30 Seconds

Burpess is a great way to start this 10-minute workout. 30 seconds of this exercise will make you realize what you have signed up for. This exercise is a total fat buster and will help you shed those extra kilos.

2. Squat Jumps – 30 Seconds

Now that your body is warmed up, squat jumps will pump all the blood into your legs. You need to make sure you’re following a complete range of motion in this exercise. Try going as deep as you can during the squats.



3. High Knees – 1 Minute

In this exercise, you mimic running while standing at a fixed point. Raise your knees as high as you can and try staying on your toes throughout the exercise. Keep your core tight and maintain a steady pace.

4. Push-Ups – 30 Seconds

We will be focusing on building upper body strength in this workout. If you have a problem performing 30-seconds of push-ups, feel free to perform assisted push-ups with your knees on the floor. You can also take a couple second rest to recover during the set.

5. Jumping Jacks – 1 Minute

Jumping jacks are incredibly efficient at burning calories and improving your agility. Performing this exercise for a minute will be a test for your cardiovascular system. You will know where you stand by the end of this one minute.

6. Squats – 30 Seconds

This is a high-intensity workout, you aren’t allowed to rest or slow down during your working sets. Squats are a compound movement which can help gain overall strength and muscles in your lower body.

7. Plank – 1 Minute

Planks are an indispensable exercise if you want a strong core. Most people make the mistake of hanging their crotch low or forming a bridge with their butt while performing this exercise. Your body should be in a straight line throughout this exercise.


8. Rest – 30 Seconds

You will appreciate this rest time more than ever before. Use this time to have water or lie down. Make sure you don’t slack and use some extra time. Get back to your workout when the clock hits 30 seconds.

9. Mountain Climbers – 30 Seconds

Mountain climbers will work your core and abs. This exercise is great if you want to build a shredded midriff. Maintain the same intensity throughout the exercise. Don’t stop before the time is over.

10. Shoulder Presses – 1 Minute

You don’t need weights for this exercise. Stand straight and mimic performing dumbbell shoulder presses. No weight shoulder presses might sound like a joke, but wait until you perform this exercise. Your shoulders will be on fire once you’re done.

11. Crunches – 1 Minute

Crunches are a staple in most cardio intensive workouts. Place your feet flat on the ground and your upper body should be perpendicular to the floor at the top of the movement. Exhale and squeeze your abs at the top of the movement to make the most of this exercise.

12. Lunges – 1 Minute

Perform bodyweight lunges for 30 seconds on each leg. This exercise will get your heart rate soaring and will help develop muscle definition and clarity in your legs. Your wheels will be filled with lactic acid at the end of this exercise.

13. Plank Pile Jumps – 1 Minute

This is the last exercise in your high-intensity workout. You should use everything you have left in the tank for this exercise. Start in a planking position, bend and jump your knees into your hands landing in a crouch on your toes. Return to the starting position and repeat.

Can you perform this workout without taking additional rest time?
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Tuesday, February 12, 2019

The Best Full-Body Barbell Workout

A great full-body workout that builds strength and burns fat doesn’t have to be complicated. Our barbells for men and women are all you need for a great workout that can be done with limited time and space.

FLOOR PRESS

This exercise targets your chest. I would strongly suggest finding a power cage but if you can’t do that, getting a squat rack with modifiable safety arms or J-hooks set just a little bit under the barbell when your arms are locked out.




The correct way to do this exercise is to lie supine under the barbell, which should now be right over your eyes, like you were about to do a bench press. You will need to spread your legs and lay them flat on the ground to get them fully disassociated from the rest of the effort that your body is providing to complete this exercise. This will put the pressure on your upper body instead. I would suggest doing this exercise with the exact same grip you take when you do bench presses. Your forearms should be perpendicular to the ground when your elbows reach their lowest point.
To start, take the bar from the rack and lock it into position right above your sternum. Bring it closer to your chest slowly until your elbows meet the floor. After that, just push it into its locked position again and start another rep. Pair this exercise with one-arm barbell flyes as well as barbell pullovers from the floor. If you want to do it best, keep it slow. You definitely don’t want to overstress your elbows by jolting them so keep in mind that the range of motion available is very short.


BACK SQUATS




  1. Place the barbell supported on the top of your back/traps. You may want to use a barbell pad to protect your shoulders and back. Keep chest lifted and eyes straight ahead. Stand with feet about shoulder distance apart, keeping knees aligned with toes.
  2. Tighten your core to brace the movement. Make sure core stays tight through the entire movement to protect lower back. Begin lowering toward the floor by bending at the knees and pressing butt back behind you, as if you were going to sit on a chair. But make sure to keep torso straight and tall as possible.
  3. Go as low as you comfortably can, keeping your weight in your heels, then press back up, contracting glutes and standing tall.


ONE-ARM BARBELL ROWS

This exercise targets your back. To perform it, place the light end of the bar on something solid and put the weight on the other end of the bar. Then, move into position looking away from the corner while holding a staggered stance over the bar. Note that your forward leg shouldn’t be on your main side. If you’re a rightie, put your left leg forward and vice versa. Grab the heavy side of the bar so that your thumb is just below the plates. Also, to make sure you don’t experience too much stress on your lower back area, you can use your elbow as a support – lay your passive forearm down on your knee or a bench, and use it to keep yourself more stable.




You want to do this exercise with a flat back, with your active lateral muscle contracted so that the heavy end of the bar moves in the direction of your shoulder, while at the same time the elbow raises as high as possible. When the time comes to put it down, do it slowly and with full control of the weight. Make sure that you reach a full lockout of your muscles and stretch them entirely when you’re lowering the barbell.
I would suggest using pull-ups and bent-over barbell rows to combine with this exercise. For maximum effect, do some very heavy cheat reps at the end of the set.


STRICT PRESS




Hold the barbell in the rack position. Flex your wrists, stack your wrists over your elbows and elbows over your hips. Press the barbell up engaging your lats as you press all the way overhead. Pull the barbell back down slow and controlled using your lats as your base. Try not to flare your ribs or overextend your back at the top of the rep.

CLOSE-GRIP BARBELL CURL

This exercise targets your biceps. To begin, take a barbell with a supinated grip (which means your palms should be up) anywhere from six to twelve inches in width. Don’t put your hands any closer because your wrists will have too much stress on them and you might strain them. Put the barbell on your thighs and stretch out your pecs. You should have your chest out and your shoulders kept back.







To perform this move, keep your elbows locked in place by your sides with your upper arms static as well. Flex your biceps and raise the bar towards your shoulders. If you want to keep your active muscles under constant stress, stop with the movement when you reach a 45 degree angle with your upper arms. I would suggest pairing this exercise up with some wide-grip barbell curls and close-grip chin-ups. If this grip is too much for your wrists, get an EZ-bar. It will be better for your joints.

FLOOR SKULLCRUSHER

This exercise targets your triceps. To perform it, load a barbell with the appropriate weight and get on the floor, on your back, with the barbell just inches away from your dome. Raise up your arms, with your elbows pointing upwards and grab the barbell with an overhand grip, which means your palms should face upwards as well. Take the grip at shoulder width or a little less wide. If your wrists hurt or if you feel any discomfort in them while practicing this grip, get a cambered bar.




When performing this move, you will need to start from a dead stop with both of your forearms vertical. Flex your triceps and extend your elbows, which will in turn help you with lifting the weight into a locked-out position right above your shoulders. When you get to the peak contraction, squeeze your triceps as hard as you can and return to the first position. However, don’t let the bar descend towards your skull (hence the name), instead, track back just a little bit with your upper arms so that the bar will stop just above the top of your head before you do another rep. Your elbows need to be in tight so that your triceps will be fully stressed throughout the exercise.
I would suggest doing this exercise with some weighted bench dips and close-grip push-ups. If your elbows hurt when you do it, get a thicker bar or some Fat Gripz and you’ll be fine.


BARBELL ROLLOUT

This exercise targets the abs. If you haven’t done rollouts before, get on your knees and put a loaded barbell on the floor in front of you. However, don’t get ready to lift – you only need two small plates on the barbell so it will roll. Extra padding on your knees will definitely help, so put a pad on the floor. Your grip should be at shoulder-width and pronated, but your arms should be locked out as well. Your knees should be right below your hips and the bar should be right below your elbows.




To execute this movement, keep a slightly rounded back and your head down so that you’re looking at the floor the entire time. Roll the bar very slowly away from you and you will feel your muscles as they are starting to activate. You will need to keep the tension in your abdominal muscles and make sure that the eccentric motion that your arms and thighs perform is done simultaneously. When you’re completely outstretched, you will almost be lying on your stomach on the floor, but all of your weight will still be on your hands and knees. If you can, keep this position for a second or two and then flex your core which will roll back the barbell into your previous position.
I would suggest pairing this exercise with floor crunches and suitcase deadlifts. If you’re having trouble doing this while kneeling, focus doing low-rep sets of negatives, which will let you walk your hands back for each rep.
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Tuesday, January 29, 2019

Sunday, December 23, 2018

Total Body Workout Plan Using Only A Barbell – 15 The Best Barbell Exercises

With this programme you are going to gain lean body mass, lose fat, improve fitness and define your physique. All of this using just a barbell!
In this workout plan, we are going to be giving you step by step instructions for exercises and a programme that will benefit you.
These are easy to perform, even in the comfort of your home. Follow the instructions closely, and you will start benefiting in a short period of time.
The programme is a perfect tool as it fits the ability to perform at any time of the day and does away with the “busy schedule” excuse as well.




The Program:

Reps & Sets
Rest time between sets and exercises must be 30-90 seconds depending on your conditioning level.

If you are a beginner, how can you progress to a more advanced level? You need to increase the intensity of training by doing one of the following:

  • Increase the number of repetitions.
  • Add sets.
  • Increase or extensively decrease the speed of the movement.
  • Decrease time of rest between sets and exercises.
  • Add weights to the barbell.
  • Use advanced training techniques such as:
  • Drop Sets: place many plates on each side of the barbell (as much as you can lift for 6-10 repetitions). Perform repetitions till concentric failure then immediately remove one plate from each side and without rest continue the exercise to failure and again remove one more plate from each side.
  • Continue this procedure until you’re out of plates.
  • Exhaustion-Set System: perform as many repetitions as possible with good technique until concentric failure occurs.
Burn System: perform a set till concentric failure, then proceed with half or partial repetitions.
Pyramids: Start with a set of 10-to-12 repetitions with a light resistance, which is increased over several sets so fewer and fewer repetitions can be performed, until reaching 1 repetition maximum. Then repeat the same sets and resistances in reverse order, with the last set consisting of 10-to-12 repetitions.
Super Slow System: perform very slow repetitions ranging from 20-to-60 seconds per repetition.
Super Setting Systems: In the first type, you use several sets of two exercises for the agonist and antagonist muscles of the body part. In the second type use one set of several exercises in rapid succession for the same muscle group or body part.

Training programme:

Once a week total body training workout:

  • Squat – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Stiff-Leg Deadlift – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Press – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Bent-over Rows – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Military Press – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Shrugs – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Biceps Curls – 4 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Triceps Extensions – 3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Good Morning – 3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Twists – 3 sets, 8-12 reps


Twice a week total body training workout (Take Two-Three days rest after each session):


Day 1:


  • Squat – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Stiff-Leg Deadlift – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Bent-over Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Military Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Shrugs – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Biceps Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Close Grip Lying Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Twists – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Crunches – 2-3 sets, 12-15 reps

Day 2:


  • Lunges – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Calf Raise – 2-3 sets, 12-15 reps
  • Wide Grip Lying Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Pullovers – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Reverse Close Grip Bent-over Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Front Raise – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Upright Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Reverse Grip Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Triceps Extensions – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Good Morning – 2-3 sets, 12-15 rep

Three times a week total body training workout (Take one day rest after each session):


Day 1:


  • Squat – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Press – 2-3 sets, 12-15 reps
  • Military Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Bent-over Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Biceps Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Lying Triceps Extensions – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Good Morning – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Crunches – 2-3 sets, 15 reps

Day 2:


  • Lunges – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Calf Raise – 2-3 sets, 12-15 reps
  • Wide Grip Lying Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Reverse Grip Bent-over Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Front Raise – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Shrugs – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Reverse Grip Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Close Grip Bench Press – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Twists – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps

Day 3:


  • Stiff-Leg Deadlift – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Pullovers – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Reverse Close Grip Bent-over Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Upright Rows – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Standing Overhead Extensions – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Bent-over Concentration Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Wrist Curls – 2-3 sets, 8-12 reps
  • Side Crunches – 2-3 sets, 12-15 reps

Exercises


Front squat


How to: 

  • Stand with the bar across your shoulders, resting on your fingertips as shown. It’s a light grip, but don’t even think about dropping the bar.
  • Now place all your weight through your heels as you bend your knees and push your hips back – sink as low as you can, but keep your back straight.
  • Push through the heels to drive back up.

Romanian deadlift



How to:

  • Stand tall with the bar at your waist and a slight bend in your knees.
  • Now shift your hips back and let the bar slide down your legs. Stop when your hamstrings tighten.
  • Keep your back neutral.
  • Drive your hips forward and squeeze your glutes to stand back up.

Snatch grip deadlift



How to:

  • With your feet hip-width and shins touching the bar, bend down to grab it.
  • Your index fingers should rest on the outer ring of the knurling.
  • Pull your hips down and raise your chest.
  • Take a deep breath to stabilise your lower back, then drive up, thrusting your hips.
  • Straighten your knees, then slide the bar back down the front of your legs to the start position.

Side lunge


How to:

  • Stand with the bar across your upper back, pulling it tightly into your traps.
  • Step one leg out; let the heel of the opposite leg take your weight.
  • Push your hips down, keeping the trail leg straight and foot flat.
  • Drive through the heel of your bent leg to stand back up.
  • Repeat on the other side.

Pull over


How to:

  • Lie on a flat bench with a good base (in the same position as for the California press) and hold the bar above your chest with a slight bend in your elbows.
  • Keep your arms in that position, then lower the weight in an arc over and behind your head.
  • When you feel a stretch in your pecs, bring the bar back up.

Good morning


How to:

  • Hold the bar across the back of your shoulders, then lean forward and push your hips back as far as possible.
  • When your hams start to tighten, push your hips straight forward and bring your chest up as you straighten.

High pull


How to:

  • Start the same as the power clean, generating momentum from your knees, hips and shoulders to drag the bar up from the floor close to your body.
  • But instead of catching, keep pulling it up, flexing your elbows to shrug the bar up to your chin like an upright row.
  • Lower it quickly – going slowly will only hurt.
  • One for the impatient.

Reverse curl


How to:

  • Hold the barbell at shoulder width with an overhand ‘motorbike’ grip.
  • Keeping your wrists still, use your biceps to curl the bar up; squeeze the muscles for a second at the top.
  • Slowly lower the weight back down, always keeping your elbows tucked in.

Cuban press


How to:

  • Hold the barbell at your waist, slightly wider than normal with an overhand grip.
  • First, row it up to your belly button.
  • Then rotate the bar to your forehead, palms facing forward.
  • Press the bar above your head.
  • Reverse the movement to bring the bar back to the start position.

Weighted hip extension


How to:

  • Sit with your knees bent and upper back resting on a bench behind you.
  • Roll the bar on to the top of your hips and hold it in place.
  • Now push your feet down, lifting your hips up until your upper body is fully supported by the bench.
  • Squeeze at the top for a second and slowly lower back down to the floor.

Meadows row


How to:

  • Place the end of the barbell in a corner, or the base of a bench, and stand at the front end of the bar at a right angle.
  • With an overhand grip, row it to your armpit.
  • Squeeze your shoulder at the top of the movement, then lower the weight back down until you feel a stretch.

Javelin Press


How to:

  • Hold the barbell at shoulder height length ways, as if it was a javelin, with your elbow underneath your wrist.
  • Don’t actually throw it.
  • Keep your grip tight and drive the bar up until your bicep is next to your ear.
  • Try to stop the bar wobbling, then lower it back to the start.

Perfect curl


How to:

  • Hold the barbell with a grip slightly wider than your shoulder width and pin your shoulder-blades back.
  • Push your hips forward and lean back.
  • As you bring the bar up, push your hips back and lean forward.
  • At the top of the curl you should be bent forward and the bar should be close to your face.
 source: gymguider.com
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